Weapons for Peace

Contest Info

  • Started: 8/29/2007 06:00
  • Ended: 8/31/2007 06:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 14
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
Weapons for Peace
Contest Directions: According to the report published on Tuesday, 90 out of 100 U.S. citizens own guns, which by far exceeds the fraction of the gun owners in other countries. Surprisingly with a big gap, the second and third places on the list are occupied by India and China, with respectively 4 and 3 firearm owners per 100 people. Over 8 million new guns are produced in the world each year, and 4.5 million of them are purchased in the United States.
The report suggests that the United States population is over armed. In this contest, let's show how any weapons can be used in non-military, peaceful purposes - show alternative use of existing weapons, or re-design weapons by changing their parts or combining them with other objects or appliances so that they could be used for domestic needs, architecture, or other peaceful purposes.

Contest Info

    • Started: 8/29/2007 06:00
    • Ended: 8/31/2007 06:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 14
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
14 pictures
  • Beef Mincer Gun

    Beef Mincer Gun
  • Soldier Pointing a Sony Cyber Shot Pistol

    Soldier Pointing a Sony Cyber Shot Pistol
  • Grenade Lightbulb

    Grenade Lightbulb
  • Girl and Her Grandma Cooking with Gun Mixer

    Girl and Her Grandma Cooking with Gun Mixer
  • Painted Egg Grenade

    Painted Egg Grenade
  • Woman Using a Colt Pistol as a Hammer

    Woman Using a Colt Pistol as a Hammer
  • Soldier with a Corn Machine Gun

    Soldier with a Corn Machine Gun
  • Swimming Pool on an Aircraft Carrier

    Swimming Pool on an Aircraft Carrier
  • Horses Driving an Army Tank

    Horses Driving an Army Tank
  • Knife Writing Pen

    Knife Writing Pen
14 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Weapons are the devices or articles constructively meant, for destroying life or other targets, or for sending signals; Fire arms are the weapons meant for mechanically destroying targets at certain distance by shells whose direction is propelled by gunpowder or other load; Main parts of fire arms - barrel, bolt, revolver, frame, barrel extension; Cold steel arms - Weapons meant for destroying targets by man's muscular power in direct contact with the object which is to be destroyed. Projectile weapon - Weapons meant for destroying targets at certain distance with a shell propelled by man's power or by a mechanical device. Air gun - Weapon meant for destroying targets at certain distance with a shell propelled by compressed, condensate or solidified gas; Gas weapon - Weapons meant for attacking temporary live targets by applying teargas shells pr other irritating materials; Ammunition- For attacking targets armament items and projectile munitions with explosives, or pyrotechnic or bursting shells, or their combination are used; Cartridge - A device meant, with the help of a casing, for firing. A cartridge contains trigger, projectile load and a dart kit; Signal guns - weapons constructively meant for only sending light, smoke or sound signals. Proliferation of fire arms and their main components (hereinafter weapons): Production of weapons, trading of weapons, sale, handover, purchase, collectioning, exhibiting, record keeping, custody, carriage, transportation, usage, confiscation, destroying, import into Russian federation and export from the Russian Federation. Production of Weapons - Research, designing, testing, and also artistic crafting and repairing of weapons, manufacturing of ammunition, cartridges and their main components. Items certified for house-hold purpose, manufacturing purpose, sport equipment or the items design-wise similar to weapons are not considered as weapons. The history of missile development: The development of radar stations of air defense complexes in the 1960's, and of other military radio engineering facilities forced to work out the new ways of their suppression, as tactical shock planes couldn't limit their functions to suppression and manoeuvring for breakthrough to the target. The most effective way was to defeat radar stations of detection and the guiding of the air defense complexes by specialized "air-to-surface" missiles with passive radar self-guidance heads. The anti-aircraft rocket complexes, produced by the Soviet Union, were encountered in Vietnam. The U.S. Air Force was the first to add the anti-radar missile AGM-45 "Shraik" to the armory in 1965. In 1968 it was followed by the anti-radar AGM-78, remodelled from the anti-aircraft missile RIM-66A, but due to its high cost (three times more expensive than the AGM-45) it was not widespread. The level of development of optical-electronic equipment reached by the 70's enabled the making of small-sized self-guidance heads having sufficient accuracy and suitable for installation on tactical missiles. The first tactical missile with an optical-electronic HST AGM-65 "Maverick" was developed and added to the armory by the USA in 1972. Its designers used passive television system for self-guidance, which enabled it to realize a principle. The choice of self-guidance systems was caused by the tactical doctrines of the states: in the USSR tactical aviation self-guided missiles were designed first of all for defeat of the centres of the enemy's defense, in the USA for defeat of armored equipment. It predetermined also the choice of the military unit: the USSR set the high-explosive warhead, the USA the hollow charge one.