Valentine Paintings

Contest Info

  • Started: 2/14/2007 06:00
  • Ended: 2/15/2007 06:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 11
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
Valentine Paintings
Contest Directions: In the Renaissance times, there was no Valentine's Day. A slap on the ass and "Love Ya" would pretty much express the affection of man to his wife. Today there's only a slap on the ass.
In this contest you are asked to add romantic Valentine's Day theme to old famous paintings. Try to modernize it where you can by adding modern day valentine's day gifts to the paintings. Examples may include Whistler's mother with the box of Hershey's Kisses, or Mona Lisa holding a bouquet of roses and valentine's card.

Contest Info

    • Started: 2/14/2007 06:00
    • Ended: 2/15/2007 06:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 11
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
11 pictures
  • Bouguereau Woman with a Valentine Teddy Bear

    Bouguereau  Woman with a Valentine Teddy Bear
        • VERY nice attention to detail & lighting in this merge, VERY nice work!
        • Awwwww... Teddy bears & hearts say Happy Valentine's Day. Great image.
        • It's cute and brilliant at the same time
        • Congratulations Babs, on a stellar Gold-Trophy-Winning entry.
  • Little Girl Capturing Cupids

    Little Girl Capturing Cupids
        • really great but the reflection of light on the bottom lid looks like there's a light source in the basket.
  • American Gothic on Valentine's Day

    American Gothic on Valentine's Day
        • Roses are red
          Violets are blue
          I'll crack a smile
          If you'll crack one, too.
        • awww. Very sweet

          Excellent Valentine's image...
        • Nice image, but her hand kind of creeps me out. It looks fuzzy. Not out of focus fuzzy...hairy fuzzy.
  • Water Girl Wearing Victoria's Secret Underwear

    Water Girl Wearing Victoria's Secret Underwear
  • Valentine Bear For David Marat

    Valentine Bear For David Marat
        • I love it. Full view shows many delicate details worked too.
        • Absolutely facinating. Are prints for sale?
  • Woman Giving a Little Girl a Valentine's Bear by Bouguereau

    Woman Giving a Little Girl a Valentine's Bear by Bouguereau
  • Van Dyck Lovers on Valentine's Day

    Van Dyck Lovers on Valentine's Day
  • Man Giving a Woman Roses in an Old Painting

    Man Giving a Woman Roses in an Old Painting
        • this is so great but there are fine lines around the flowers and the teddy bear. try to mask just a little bit closer
  • Woman Getting Flowers From Her Secret Admirer Painting

    Woman Getting Flowers From Her Secret Admirer Painting
  • Little Girl Giving Her Mom a Valentine's Gift by Bouguereau

    Little Girl Giving Her Mom a Valentine's Gift by Bouguereau
        • Please don't put special characters ˇˇˇ in the title of your emtry.
  • Woman in Old Painting with a Box of Chocolates

    Woman in Old Painting with a Box of Chocolates
11 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Romanticism in paintings, first defined as an aesthetic in literary criticism around 1800, gained momentum as an artistic movement in France and Britain in the early decades of the nineteenth century and flourished until the mid-century. In French and British paintings of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the recurrence of images of shipwrecks and other representations of man's struggle against the awesome power of nature manifest this sensibility. Another facet of Romantic art toward nature emerges in the landscapes of John Constable, whose art expresses his response to his native English countryside. For his major paintings, Constable executed full-scale sketches. This interest in the individual and subjective, at odds with eighteenth-century rationalism, is mirrored in the Romantic approach to the portrait. Traditionally, records of individual likeness portraits became vehicles for expressing a range of psychological and emotional states in the hands of Romantic painters. Gericault probed the extremes of mental illness in his portraits of psychiatric patients. Along with plumbing emotional and behavioral extremes, Romantic artists expanded the repertoire of subject matter, rejecting the didacticism of neoclassical history painting in favor of imaginary and exotic subjects. Chassériau documented his visit to Algeria in notebooks filled with watercolors and drawings, which later served as models for paintings done in his Paris studio. In its stylistic diversity and range of subjects, Romanticism defies simple categorization. As the poet and critic Charles Baudelaire wrote in 1846, "Romanticism in paintings is precisely situated neither in choice of subject nor in exact truth, but in a way of feeling."