Traffic Light

Contest Info

  • Started: 9/7/2009 13:00
  • Ended: 9/12/2009 17:00
  • Level: apprentice
  • Entries: 8
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Apprentice 1st Place $1.5
  • FN Apprentice 2nd Place $0.9
  • FN Apprentice 3rd Place $0.6
  • FN Apprentice 4th Place $0.3
Traffic Light
Contest Directions: Photoshop this traffic light image (click to download) any way you wish. Some examples are: re-designing this traffic light, merging traffic light with other objects or animals, putting the traffic light into some unusual environment, using this traffic light image in advertisements, movies, paintings, etc. These are just some ideas.
Many thanks to Davide Guglielmo and Stock Exchange for providing the source photo.

Contest Info

    • Started: 9/7/2009 13:00
    • Ended: 9/12/2009 17:00
    • Level: apprentice
    • Entries: 8
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Apprentice 1st Place $1.5
    • FN Apprentice 2nd Place $0.9
    • FN Apprentice 3rd Place $0.6
    • FN Apprentice 4th Place $0.3
This gallery only contains our top 7 selections from its parent contest Traffic Lights. All 8 contest pictures can be viewed here.
  • Quantum of Solace Traffic Lights

    Quantum of Solace Traffic Lights
  • Go For Free Computer Programs

    Go For Free Computer Programs
  • Traffic Light Insect on Womans Leg

    Traffic Light Insect on Womans Leg
  • Recycled Traffic Light

    Recycled Traffic Light
  • New Traffic Lights

    New Traffic Lights
  • Traffic Light on Tree Branch with Seaguls

    Traffic Light on Tree Branch with Seaguls
  • Traffic Light Worshipers Pop Art

    Traffic Light Worshipers Pop Art
  • Mustard and Ketchup

    Mustard and Ketchup
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This contest is fueled by the following news: A traffic light is an optical alarm system, intended for regulating the movement of people, bicycles, cars and other participants of vehicular traffic, trains of railway and tube railroad, river and sea ships. History: For the first time, traffic lights were established on December 10, 1868 in London near the British parliament building. Its inventor - J. P.Knight was an expert in railway semaphores. Types of traffic lights: Traffic lights with three colored signals (usually round) are widely popular. The colors used in traffic lights are red, yellow and green. In some countries, an orange color is used in place of yellow. The signals can be vertical-mounted (in this case, the red signal should always be at the top and green first from below) as well as horizontal-mounted (in this case, the red signal should always be at the extreme left and the green signal on the extreme right). In the absence of other special traffic lights, they regulate movement of all kinds of vehicles and pedestrians (the movement of pedestrians could be without traffic lights at crossroads). Sometimes traffic light signals have a special display with reverse time counting, which shows the glowing time of a signal. More often, the reverse time counting displays are made for the green signal on the traffic light but in some cases, the display shows the remaining time of the red signal. Practically everywhere, the red signal of the traffic light disallows movement; the yellow light bans the exit into an area protected by traffic lights but permits to complete its passage and green permits movement. The use of a combination of red and yellow signals, which designates glowing of the green signal, is widely used but not everywhere. Sometimes the green signal glows immediately after the red without the intermediate yellow but not vice versa. The sSignal application details differ depending on the Traffic rules accepted in a specific country. Traffic lights with two sections exist - red and green. Such traffic lights are usually established at places where the entry of cars is done in an individual order, for example, on border transitions, during entry or exit from a parking place, a protected territory etc. Flashing signals can also be established. In Russia and in many European countries, the flashing green signal indicates that the yellow signal will glow next. Cars, approaching the traffic light with a flashing green signal, can take enough measures to apply brakes so as to avoid exit onto the crossroads protected by the traffic light or crossing-over the red signal. The flashing yellow signal indicates to slow down the speed of your vehicle while crossing a crossroad or pedestrian crossing when it's unregulated (for example, at night, when regulating is not required due to less traffic movement). Sometimes special traffic lights, consisting of one or two alternately flashing yellow lights are used for these purposes. Arrows and directional sections: Additional sections in the form of arrows or contours of arrows, which regulate the movement in one or the other direction, are found on traffic lights. The rules are: * An outlined arrow on a red (yellow, green) background is the usual traffic light, applicable only in a given direction; * A continuous green arrow on a black background allows thoroughfare, but does not give preference during turnouts. "Always flashing" green sections, made in the form of a plate with a green arrow, are encountered in some cities. Such signals indicate that a "right turn" is allowed even during flashing of the red signal. However, unlike the "present" additional section, such arrows allow but do not bind the driver to turn. Thus, the driver who wants to go straight, can calmly occupy this lane and the drivers standing behind, wishing to turn right on such an "arrow" have to wait. In driver's language, so as to distinguish such arrow-placards from arrow-additional sections, they are called "cardboard". A red flashing signal (as a rule, on traffic lights with one or two alternately flashing red sections) is used for guarding the intersections with tram lines during approach of a tram, bridges during drawing, sections of roads near runways of airports during take-off and the landing of planes at a dangerous height. These traffic lights are similar to that, which are used near railway crossings (see below). Taffic lights established at railway crossings Consisting of two horizontally located red lanterns on a section of a crossing and of one moon-white colored lantern. The white lantern is located between a red, below or above the line connecting the red lanterns. The significance of the signals is as follows: * Two alternately flashing red lanterns means passing through the crossing is not permitted; the given signal is usually accompanied by a sound alarm system (bell); * The flashing white lantern indicates that the technical system of the level crossing is functioning. Since it does not flash, when the crossing is closed or being closed, the moon-white lantern is often is often misinterpreted as the "go" signal. The reverse traffic light: For regulating the traffic on strips of driveway (especially where reverse movement is possible), special traffic lights for checking the strips (reverse) are used. According to the Viennese convention on traffic signs and signals, such traffic lights can have two or three signals: * The red X-shaped signal, which forbids movement on the strip; * The green arrow, pointing downwards, allows movement; * The additional signal in the form of a diagonal yellow arrow informs about changes of the operating mode of the strip and indicates the direction in which it is necessary to vacate the strip.
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