Tin Man

Contest Info

  • Started: 7/8/2011 11:00
  • Ended: 7/12/2011 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 43
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Tin Man
Contest Directions: This Friday we continue our freaking experiment with provided source images.
Photoshop this tin man image (photo credit Cal KT) any way you wish. Some examples are - making the tin man perform stunts, putting this tin man into some new environment, movies, paintings, etc. These are just some ideas.

Contest Info

    • Started: 7/8/2011 11:00
    • Ended: 7/12/2011 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 43
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
43 pictures
  • Tin Transformers

    Tin Transformers
  • Mrs.Robot Has a Baby

    Mrs.Robot Has a Baby
  • Tin Dragon

    Tin Dragon
  • Tin Chameleon

    Tin Chameleon
  • Tin Robot on Gaming Magazine

    Tin Robot on Gaming Magazine
  • The Amazing Tin Man

    The Amazing Tin Man
  • Robots Have Last Drinks On Earth

    Robots Have Last Drinks On Earth
  • Tinman Stops Fire Truck on Abbey Road

    Tinman Stops Fire Truck on Abbey Road
  • Iron Fish

    Iron Fish
  • Tin Man in Saturday Night Fever

    Tin Man in Saturday Night Fever
43 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Tin (Latin Stannum; denoted by the symbol "Sn") is an element of the main subgroup of the fourth and fifth period of D.I. Mendeleev's periodic table of the chemical elements. The atomic number of stannum (tin) is 50. It belongs to the group of light metals. Under normal conditions, the simple substance tin is plastic, malleable and easily fusible silver-white colored shining metal. Tin forms two allotropic modifications: less than 13.2 C, stable α-tin (gray tin) with diamond-type cubic lattice, above 13.2 C - stable β-tin (white tin) with tetragonal crystal lattice. History: Tin was known to people already in the 4th millennium B.C. This metal was inaccessible and expensive because articles made from tin, are rarely found among Greek and Roman antiquities. Reference about tin can be found in the Bible, and the Fourth Book of Moses. Tin (along with copper) is one of the components of bronze, which was invented at the end or middle of the 3rd millennium B.C. Since bronze was the strongest of the metals and alloys known at that time, tin was a "strategic metal" during the "Bronze Age" for more than 2000 years (roughly: 35 - 11 centuries B.C.) In nature: Tin is a rare trace element and it occupies 47th place according to its availability in the earth's crust. Clarke tin content in the earth's crust, according to various estimates, ranges from 2 10-4 to 8 10-3 % by mass. The main mineral of tin is cassiterite (tin stone) SnO2, containing up to 78.8% of tin. Stannite (tin pyrites) more rarely occurs in nature - Cu2FeSnS4 (27.5% Sn). Occurrence: Global deposits of tin are in South-East Asia, mainly in China, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. Large deposits of tin are also found in South America (Bolivia, Peru, Brazil) and Australia. Abundance in nature: In non-contaminated surface waters, tin is found in submicrogram concentrations. In groundwaters, its concentration reaches a few micrograms per dm and increases in regions of tin-ore deposits, it falls into water by the breaking down of primarily sulfide minerals, which are unstable in the oxidation zone. Tin is an amphoteric element, i.e, an element, capable of possessing acidic and alkali properties. This property of tin determines the features of its occurrence in nature. Occurrence forms: The main form of occurrence in rocks and minerals is trace. However, tin appears even in mineral forms and occurs in this form commonly not only as secondary in acidic igneous rocks but also forms a commercial concentration, predominantly in oxide (cassiterite SnO2) and sulfide (stannite) forms. Tin plague: The contact of gray and white tin leads to the "contamination" of white tin. The set of this phenomena is called "tin plague". One of the methods to prevent "tin plague" is the addition of a stabilizer to the tin, such as bismuth. Interesting facts: "Tin Plague" was one of the reasons for the death of Scott's expedition to South Pole in 1912. The Expedition was left with no fuel due to the fact that it leaked through the tin-sealed cans, damaged by "tin plague", so called in 1911 by G. Cohen . Some historians point to "tin plague" as one of the circumstances, leading to the defeat of Napoleon's army in Russia in 1812 - extreme cold, led to the transformation of tin buttons on the army uniforms to turn into powder. "Tin plague" destroyed many valuable tin soldier collections. For instance, dozens of figures turned into dust in the basement of Alexander Suvorov's memorial museum in St. Petersburg. Figures were stored in the basement and this occurred due to a defective heating system in winter. Application: Mainly, tin is used as a safe, non-toxic, corrosion-resistant coating in a pure form or in alloys with other metals. The main industrial applications of tin - in tinned steel sheet for manufacturing food product packagings, in solders for electronics, in domestic pipelines, in bearing alloys and in the coatings of tin and its alloys. The most important alloy of tin is bronze (with copper). Another well known alloy - pewter, is used for making pottery. Recently, renewed interest was shown in the application of the metal, since it is the most "ecological" amongst the heavy non-ferrous metals. Tin is used in the manufacture of superconducting wires on the inter-metallic compound Nb3Sn base. Prices of tin metal in 2006 was around 12 - 18 dollars per kg, high pure tin dioxide was about 25 dollars/kg, high purity single-crystal tin was around 210 dollars / kg. The inter-metallic compounds of tin and zirconium have high melting points (upto 2000C) and oxidation-resistant when heated in air and have a number of applications. Tin is an important alloying component for obtaining structural titanium alloys. Tin dioxide is a highly effective abrasive material, used for the "fine finishing" on the surfaces of optical glass. The mixture of tin salts - "yellow composition" was previously used as a dye for wool. Tin is also used in chemical sources of power as an anode material, for example, the manganese-tin element and the mercury oxide tin cell. It is prospective to use tin in the lead-tin cell, for example, at equal voltage, when compared to a lead-acid cell, a lead-tin cell has 2.5 times more capacity and 5 times more energy strength per unit volume and its internal resistance is much lower. Physiological effect: Metallic tin is not toxic, which makes it safer to use in the food industry. Harmful mixtures, contained in tin in usual storage and usage conditions, that melt at temperature of 600C, are not released into the air of a working area in volumes exceeding the maximum permissible concentration. Long-term (over 15-20 years) exposure to tin dust has a fibrogenic effect on the lungs and can cause pneumoconiosis in workers.