Sharks in the Army

Contest Info

  • Started: 3/2/2006 06:00
  • Ended: 3/4/2006 06:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 13
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $30
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $18
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $12
Sharks in the Army
Contest Directions: Create images of stealth / spy / military sharks equipped to do their job. Shark ( stealth / spy/ military ) recruitment adverts/billboards, magazine covers are also welcome.

Contest Info

    • Started: 3/2/2006 06:00
    • Ended: 3/4/2006 06:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 13
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $30
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $18
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $12
13 pictures
  • Stealth Shark

    Stealth Shark
  • Stealth Shark

    Stealth Shark
  • Shark Bomber

    Shark Bomber
  • Shark

    Shark
  • Stealth Shark

    Stealth Shark
  • Wart Shark

    Wart Shark
  • Sonar Shark

    Sonar Shark
  • Shark to Air Missile

    Shark to Air Missile
  • Shark Recruitment

    Shark Recruitment
  • Land Shark

    Land Shark
13 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: The U.S. Department of Defense is funding research with hopes of turning real life sharks into stealth spies. The Pentagon hopes to turn sharks into living devices capable of gliding undetected through ocean waters. The plan involves placing neural implants into sharks which will transmit information that the Pentagon desires. The research itself (which was reported in "New Scientist" in the United Kingdom) builds on experiments undertaken to control animals by implanting electrodes into their brains which are stimulated to produce desired behavior. Ultimately, the Pentagon hopes to take advantage of a shark's natural ability to glide through water, to sense delicate electrical changes and to follow chemical trails. By being able to remotely control a shark's movements, the Pentagon hopes to literally turn these fish into stealth spies. Presently, the experiments have been performed in laboratories but will be replicated in natural environments. Communication with the sharks will be made through the U.S. Navy's acoustic towers that are capable of sending sonar signals to a shark upwards to 300 kilometers away. We will talk about how to catch sharks. And about those, who catch them. Sharks, are "tigers of ocean", and there are around 350 types in the sea. However, one can bet that very few people exist in the world who specialize in catching the "sea tiger". Americans Jill Soly and John McLaughlin, who work with their bare hands, undoubtedly belong to this list. And the matter is not that they are such brave men. Simply, their catch should meet rigid requirements: after all, they supply sharks to scientific and commercial oceanariums and wounded sharks are mercilessly discarded. Their shark catching method starts with strictly verified facts. First, sharks have poor sight. But, a "sixth sense" is developed in them a unique combination sonar and radar, allowing it to perceive sound and mechanical vibrations, created by fish or a human being at a considerable distance. At last, one more important feature: the shark receives its required oxygen from the water only while moving at a quick speed, which means that the shark cannot remain stationary at one place for long periods. These things make the theoretical base for catching sharks. Hunting, in its essence, boils down to simple techniques, which, if the desire is there, almost everyone can master. First, bait is fixed to the hook - for this, it is possible to use even an old hat, but, better to have a piece of fish and it is thrown into the water, at which point of the ocean is immaterial, only that sharks should be found in that area."Do not be afraid, they will not keep you waiting for long" guarantees Soly. "Around 15 minutes later, when you did not fall off the deck after the strongest jerk, with a sigh of relief, you can think that the shark is caught. Half the work is done. Now, it is necessary to keep the shark for 2 - 3 hrs on the hook so as to bring down the ardour. In this case, do not dislocate your shoulder joints since they might be useful for you later. If it is possible, take a rest for 5 minutes before starting the final phase". Soly and McLaughlin themselves do it like this. Having reliably fixed the string with a floating shark on a hook and wearing scuba gear, they dive into the water and cautiously swim up to the tired captive. Then, they seize the pectoral and dorsal fins, depriving it of any mobility. "It is very important to approach the shark from behind because, even the tired blue shark has got enough strength to tear you apart" recommends McLaughlin. "Even if the shark beats you, for God's sake, do not let the captive free. After some time, due to lack of oxygen, the shark looks like your lovely old aunt, who once in a while drinks a glass of port wine, get drunk and becomes soft. Everything is not finished here. Hold the shark under the fins and delicately drag it into a previously prepared cage". "Sea tiger hunters" do not hide that catching ocean cannibals, at times, is coupled with troubles. Once, when they tried a "lasso" on a 4m hammerhead shark, the lasso was broken loose from the hook. Nothing to think about to retain the shark in place until it is "intoxicated". "We appeared to be on some kind of infuriated "observation wheel"- recalled Soly later and were engaged only in desperately holding onto it. The fact that not so long before we got a loan from the Florida Aquarium and we did not wish to go to the other world with debts intact, with an aim not to undermine our reputation. Fortunately, for a moment earlier than us, the shark broke off from this wheel, John managed to move the shark, using a bludgeon filled with lead, to hit it on the nose". If you do not consider such unpleasant inevitable trifles, Jill Soly and John McLaughlin are convinced that the "sea tiger hunting" profession is no more dangerous at all, than for instance, the hare hunting profession. Only that, in their opinion, it is necessary to train the beginner hunter, for example, even if you hold the shark in your hands, it is still unclear who has caught whom.