Obama Teleprompter Obstruction

Contest Info

  • Started: 8/24/2012 06:00
  • Ended: 8/28/2012 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 52
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Obama Teleprompter Obstruction
Contest Directions: This Friday we continue our freaking experiment with provided source images.
Photoshop this image of Obama teleprompter obstruction any way you wish. Some examples are - swapping the Obama's teleprompter for some other objects, making Obama give campaign speech at unusual places, using this Obama teleprompter obstruction image in movies, paintings, etc. These are just some ideas.

Contest Info

    • Started: 8/24/2012 06:00
    • Ended: 8/28/2012 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 52
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
52 pictures
  • Barack Obama Playing in Hamlet with a Skull

    Barack Obama Playing in Hamlet with a Skull
  • Barack Obama on the Mausoleum

    Barack Obama on the Mausoleum
52 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: The teleprompter is a specialized monitor, reflecting the text of a speech or script for an announcer or actor, which is invisible to the audience. Earlier, paper tape and cards were used for the same purpose. Even if a message is placed next to the lens, the announcer had to divert his eyes. The eleprompter is positioned directly before the lens and an announcer, referring to message, does not stop looking into the camera and the audience have the illusion of spontaneous speech. Device: The modern teleprompter is a screen, positioned next to the camera and a see through mirror before the lens. The transparency of the mirror is selected in such a way that the camera can shoot through it and at the same time, the message is easily visible. The teleprompter needs a very highly sensitive camera, which itself is a drawback of the teleprompter. However, this is not an issue for modern television cameras. The message scrolling speed is controlled either by a person, sitting in the hardware or by the anchor (with the help of hidden pedal). History: The development of first teleprompters was confirmed in the USA in the 1950s. The company "TelePrompter" (USA) was founded in 1950s by Fred Barton Jr., Hubert J. Schlafly and Irving Berlin Kahn. Barton was an actor, who came out with the teleprompter idea as means to help the television anchors, who were required to memorize huge texts in the shortest period of time. The first teleprompter Compu=Prompt, based on the personal computer, appeared in 1982. It was created and manufactured by Courtney M. Goodin and Laurence B. Abrams in Hollywood. The setup was a bundled software for the Atari 800 and an upgraded video camera. Later on, the company renamed itself into "ProPromt Inc", which is dealing with teleprompters till this day. Other manufacturing companies of paper teleprompters "Q-TV" and "Telescript" did not stay behind and after few years, they came out with their versions of computer-based teleprompters. During that period, the graphics subsystem of the computer was in a position to smoothly scroll the displayed text. It is also necessary to note that Jess Oppenheimer, the producer of the series "I Love Lucy", stated that he was the author of the teleprompter idea and also received the patent. Though, the device initially helped Lucille Ball reading the advertisements, it soon gained popularity while creating the news editions. At the end of the 1990s and the beginning of 2000, the company "Autoscript" was the first to use LCD monitors in place of the old-fashioned CRT monitors. This allowed it to considerably reduce the weight of the camera, making it much more mobile. The same company introduced high contrast displays, which allowed it to use teleprompters under direct sun light. As further development to its achievements, the company released Voice Activated Prompting teleprompters in 2005. This facilitated in avoiding the additional devices for controlling the scroll speed. The new teleprompter simply scrolls the text once it is read by a person. Modern usage: Television: Modern teleprompters for television news editions consist of a personal computer and the monitors on each camera are connected to a personal computer. Usually, the monitors are black and white and display the reversed image, which is visible after reflection in the mirror. The peripheral device a button is connected to the computer and it is possible to slow down or speed up the text scrolling speed or even scroll the text backwards with the help of the button. For better readability, the text is displayed in white letters against a black background. Difficult works, for instance, foreign names, are often displayed according to phonetics but not according to correct spelling (this is what happens for many languages). Speeches: Teleprompters are also used during performances and speeches. The mirror with a partial reflection coat is used as a reflecting surface in such teleprompters. It is practically transparent and does not cover the view for the audience or cameras. Usually two such teleprompters are fitted on both sides of the platform (if available) in such a way that the orator, while looking towards any part of the auditorium, can look into any one of the teleprompters. With the exception of change in appearance, such teleprompters do not differ from the teleprompters used in the television industry. Also, personal teleprompters are now gaining popularity - applications, which are run on personal computer or notebooks for a gradual display of test on an existing screen. They have become popular during performances, ceremonies etc. Concerts: Sometimes, teleprompters are used during concerts, with an intention to help the performers, who cannot memorize the words of songs. These teleprompters are identical to those used during performances, or simply a monitor fitted on the stage. "Interrotron": Errol Morris, director of documentary films, used the system "Interrotron" during an interview, which is identical to a teleprompter. The teleprompter equipment is fitted on a camera (often a film camera). Instead of displaying the text for reading, an image is displayed on the screen from a video camera, aimed at Morris, sitting next to it. While answering the questions of Morris, the interviewee does not look sideways but directly towards the lens of the camera. The camera, aimed at Morris, can also be equipped similarly. The given technology can create a feeling of a face-to-face communication during an interview.