Money Art

Contest Info

  • Started: 9/9/2008 18:00
  • Ended: 9/12/2008 18:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 27
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Money Art
Contest Directions: Today we have another sequel to our contest Money Celebrities that was mega-popular with magazines, sites and blogs. This time we are going to show that, just like celebrities, art is 'so money'.
In your entries you should include a banknote (of any country) folded so that the person depicted on the banknote is merged with art source (painting, sketch, statue, or fresco) of your choice, similar to how it's done in this example. Feel welcome to merge the lower part of the face on the banknote or upper part. Please mention either in your entry title or creator's comments what country banknote you are using.

Contest Info

    • Started: 9/9/2008 18:00
    • Ended: 9/12/2008 18:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 27
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
This gallery only contains our top 11 selections from its parent contest Money Art. All 27 contest pictures can be viewed here.
  • Rembrandt's Money

    Rembrandt's Money
  • The Money Family

    The Money Family
  • Leighton Biondina Bank Note

    Leighton Biondina Bank Note
  • Napolean Chilean Banknote

    Napolean Chilean Banknote
  • Rembrandt Peale Money

    Rembrandt Peale Money
  • Raphael Cherub 100 Dollar Bill

    Raphael Cherub 100 Dollar Bill
  • Sphinx Pyramid Money

    Sphinx Pyramid Money
  • Fifty Dollar Bill Painting

    Fifty Dollar Bill Painting
  • Elvos by Warhol with 20 Dollar Bills

    Elvos by Warhol with 20 Dollar Bills
  • Statue of David with a 100 Dollar Bill

    Statue of David with a 100 Dollar Bill
  • Rembrandt with Canadian Five Dollar Note

    Rembrandt with Canadian Five Dollar Note
  • David Marat Money

    David Marat Money
  • Ten Dollar Note Renoir

    Ten Dollar Note Renoir
  • Vietnam Memorial Statue Money

    Vietnam Memorial Statue Money
  • Pablo Picasso and a UK Ten Pound Note

    Pablo Picasso and a UK Ten Pound Note
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This contest is fueled by the following news: The appearance of the quantitative theory of money, according to which the increase in the amount of money in circulation becomes reason for the growth of prices, is related with the increase of prices as the result of the influx of huge masses of gold and silver. In reality, the growth of monetary aggregates reflects the decrease of value of noble metals as in this case the value of goods is expressed in a huge amount of gold or silver. In the course of strong inflation, like in Germany in the 1920's, money circulation in general may be inferior to the natural exchange. There are examples when the rational policies of the government resulted in a long period of decreased retail prices by increasing salaries (for example during the Government of L. Erchard in West Germany starting from 1948). Significant inflation (ten and more percent per year) certifies the economical problems in a government. Sufficiently frequent strong inflation, which is also called hyper inflation (the level of which may reach thousands and even tens of thousands percent per year) occurs due to the reason that in compensating the budget deficit, the government issues an excess amount of monetary aggregates. For the modern economy, in which obligations of not having self value play the role of money, small inflation is considered as normal and necessary and it is at a level of several percent per year. The inflation level generally increases by several times at the end of year, when with the level of consumption of goods by households increases also the level of consumption by corporations. Apart from this, the gradual depreciation of money takes place in modern economical conditions in all countries of the world. For example: the dollar inflation (on average) is 4 percent per year, the Euro is 3.5 percent per year. Governments of developing (other) countries always try to maintain the inflation in their countries of no less than 4 percent per year as this favors the reduction of price on their products going for export. An "Electronic Payment", which is a puzzling term for many is more often popping up off-late in the press. Some of the uninitiated, who stumbled on this word form, think that the discussion is about the remote operation of a bank account. Someone thinks about credit cards or interbank transfers... And only a small section of people, who are already aware of new payment technologies understand what it is all about and also do not refuse using it. In some respects, electronic payments are similar to narcotics. They are comfortable that it is sufficient to pay through electronic methods so as to instantly get connected to "sub-network" - it is so convenient. Is it difficult to trust? Lets see how it works. Imagine that, you have a wallet, which possesses miraculous properties. If you have lost it and it falls into hands of strangers, no one can open it to take your money. In this case, you will not part from your money: on your command, the money will be transferred from the lost wallet into a new wallet within no time. If you have lost it the money will not get lost, simply it will be transferred into a new wallet. If suddenly, you need to transfer money to your grandmother, who lives in the U.S. (although, given that the grandmother too has such a wonderful wallet), then it is not necessary to find a bank or a "Western Union" office. It is sufficient for you to give a command to the wallet and the required amount will be instantly transferred from yours - into your grandmother's wallet, regardless of time of day, distance and borders, that divide you both. Moreover, this wonderful wallet would, without participation of anybody, diligently maintain a list of all money transfers made or received by you. And takes a receipt from each recipient, which has the digital equivalent of a signature. In addition, it carefully hides not only the contents from the public eye but also all your payments. For every money transfer, a special coded channel is created, which cannot be noticed even by intelligence agencies with all the modern technologies at their disposal. Details about how much money is transferred and to whom, is known only to the owner of the wallet and the recipient. If you can imagine everything that is said above, then you probably understand how the electronic payment system functions. You must agree it is quite attractive and because it is not surprising, that only a few years after the appearance of such a thing, the number of its clients in Russia for example is several million customers. The author of this article himself uses electronic payments for several years and pays the mobile bills for the entire family, satellite TV, Internet access, utility payments, "downloads" mp3-music, prints photos and much more through an e-wallet . Without going anywhere, he makes payments from the comfort of home and not even getting up from his chair, within one or two minutes having a cup of coffee and thus significantly saving on many of these payments by not paying extra charges to sellers of telephone and Internet-cards. So, how does the "electronic money" function and how does it differ from regular "money"? In fact, in any given case, the term "money" is not quite correct, because, in a modern sense, it represents a specific paper money or coins, that are issued by state institutions. Sometime in the past, money was printed by all and sundry; not only the state but also titled nobility, knightly orders and big companies issued money. In due time, Hanse, East Indian and Russian-American companies had their own money. But, presently, the printing of money is the prerogative of government authorities. The payment for goods or services can be made not only through money but also through their substitutes in various forms.
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