Loch Ness Hoax

Contest Info

  • Started: 8/2/2012 06:00
  • Ended: 8/5/2012 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 13
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Loch Ness Hoax
Contest Directions: Nessie (Loch Ness Monster) is one of the most valuable legends in tourism industry attracting over a million visitors a year to Loch Ness. While most of the photo and video evidence of Nessie turned out to be a hoax or wishful thinking, tens of thousands of Nessie-searching enthusiasts come to the Loch Ness lake every year with sophisticated video equipment hoping to catch Nessie on camera. Last Friday, British tabloid The Sun published the latest and the clearest photo of Nessie ever, taken by George Edwards, 60, who has spent 60 hours a week for the past 26 years searching for the mythical monster.
In this contest you are asked to show how Loch Mess Monster hoax could have been created. Was it photoshop editing of swimming elephant, or perhaps a diver holding a puppet monster? Tell us your version of how Nessie might be created.

Contest Info

    • Started: 8/2/2012 06:00
    • Ended: 8/5/2012 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 13
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
13 pictures
  • Craif Ferguson the Loch Ness Aquatic Puppet

    Craif Ferguson the Loch Ness Aquatic Puppet
  • Loch Ness Monster Culprit Caught

    Loch Ness Monster Culprit Caught
  • Loch Ness Monster Mystery Solved

    Loch Ness Monster Mystery Solved
  • Giraffe Walking in Loch Ness

    Giraffe Walking in Loch Ness
  • Lizard with a Loch Ness Monster Mask on its Tail

    Lizard with a Loch Ness Monster Mask on its Tail
  • Loch Ness Monster Hoaxer Arrested

    Loch Ness Monster Hoaxer Arrested
  • Aliens Create Hologram of Loch Ness Monster

    Aliens Create Hologram of Loch Ness Monster
  • Loch Ness Monster Hoax Tricks

    Loch Ness Monster Hoax Tricks
  • Loch Ness Monster on a Submarine

    Loch Ness Monster on a Submarine
  • Giant Octupus in Loch Ness

    Giant Octupus in Loch Ness
13 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Loch Ness Monster (cryptozoology name Lat. Nessitera rhombopteryx, English: Loch Ness Monster; Nessie) is a water monster, according to legends, living in the Scotland river the Loch Ness. History: According to legend, Roman legionaries, who with swords in hands had mastered the Celtic spaces in the beginning of the Christian era, were the first ones to reveal the mysterious creature in the remote Scottish lake to the world. Local residents immortalized all the representatives of Scottish fauna - from deer to mice in stones. The unusual image of a long-necked giant sized seal was the only stone statue, which the Romans could not identify. The first documented reference about the mysterious creature, inhabiting the waters of lake Loch Ness, dates back to the 6th century BC. The triumph of the saint over the "water beast" in the river Ness was narrated in the Life of St. Columbia, which was written 100 yrs after the events by Adomnan, who was an abbot of the Iona monastery in Scotland. Saint Columba was converting the pagan picts and Scots to the faith in his new monastery on Scotland's west coast. Thus, Columba baptized Brood I, King of Picts around 565 years AD and at Inverness, the capital of Brood, was located not far away from Loch Ness. According to the Life of St. Columba, Columba came to Loch Ness and saw that the locals were burying one of their people - the person was mutilated and killed while swimming in the lake. The person was killed by Nisag (the Celtic name of monster). Armed with hooks, local residents warded off the monster and dragged the dead body to the shore. One of the disciples of St. Columba thoughtlessly jumped into the water and swam the narrow strait to bring the boat. When he was swimming from the shore, a strange type of beast came out of water, which was similar to a gigantic frog but was not a frog. Columba drove away the monster through prayers. Later on, the "monster" was quiet for a long time and in 1880, it suddenly resurfaced during a calm and clear sky to overturn a sailboat and drag all the people down. Immediately the monster was remembered and it was good to find people who saw it. That's how the legend of the Loch-Ness monster started. During the spring time of 1933, for the first time, the newspaper the "Inverness Courier" published a detailed story of a married couple called McKay, who saw Nessie with their own eyes. Construction of the road was taken up in the same year along the northern bank of the lake. Several people and machines appeared on the deserted shores and the entire surroundings were resounding with explosions and the roaring of motors. The creature could have been overwhelmed by irritation or curiosity and it was spotted often particularly during that period. E. Maunter organized a network of observation points around the lake. The monster was sighted 15 times in a five week period. In 1934, the existence of Nessie was debated in Scottish Parliament and a decision was taken to capture the monster. However, this proposal had to be dropped as the majority of scientists believed that there were no evidence of the existence of the Loch Ness monster. In 1943, military pilot B. Farrell reported to the authorities that, he spotted Nessie while flying over the lake at an altitude of 250 yards. But during those days, the British government's focus was not on the monster. In 1951, a local forester and his friend spotted the monster. The following year, Mrs. Greta Fineli with her son saw Nessie on the lake shore. In 1957, Mrs. Constance Whyte, who lived near the lake for many years, published a book "More than a legend", which was a collection of 117 stories of eyewitnesses, who spotted Nessie. The appearance of the monster was almost the same in all the stories: huge body, long neck and small head. Surgeon's Photo: Gradually, based upon these descriptions, a public imagination of the monster had developed like that of a prehistoric creature, living deep under the water. One year later, this image got real embodiment thanks to the so-called "Surgeon photo". Its owner, Dr. Kenneth R. Wilson, from London, confirmed that he took the photo of the monster by accident while travelling around and watching the birds. In 1994, it was established that this photograph was fake, which was made by Dr. Wilson and his three friends. Two of the friends of Wilson confessed to the concoction of their story, whereas their first confession (in 1975) had gone without public attention due to the people's trust in Dr. Wilson and they didn't see any ill intentions behind his motives.