Loch Ness Hoax

Contest Info

  • Started: 8/11/2011 11:00
  • Ended: 8/14/2011 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 17
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Loch Ness Hoax
Contest Directions: Nessie (Loch Ness Monster) is one of the most valuable legends in tourism industry attracting over a million visitors a year to Loch Ness. While most of the photo and video evidence of Nessie turned out to be a hoax or wishful thinking, tens of thousands of Nessie-searching enthusiasts come to the Loch Ness lake every year with sophisticated video equipment hoping to catch Nessie on camera.
In this contest you are asked to show how Loch Mess Monster hoax could have been created. Was it photoshop editing of swimming elephant, or perhaps a diver holding a puppet monster? Tell us your version of how Nessie might be created.

Contest Info

    • Started: 8/11/2011 11:00
    • Ended: 8/14/2011 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 17
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
17 pictures
  • Al Gore as the Loch Ness Monster

    Al Gore as the Loch Ness Monster
  • David Hasselhoff with Fake Loch Ness Monster

    David Hasselhoff with Fake Loch Ness Monster
  • Elephant Underwater in Loch Ness

    Elephant Underwater in Loch Ness
  • Godzilla Decoy in Loch Ness

    Godzilla Decoy in Loch Ness
  • Wooly Mammoth in Lock Ness

    Wooly Mammoth in Lock Ness
  • Loch Ness Monster Trick Photography

    Loch Ness Monster Trick Photography
  • Fake Loch Ness Monster

    Fake Loch Ness Monster
  • The Secret of the Loch Ness Monster

    The Secret of the Loch Ness Monster
  • Loch Ness Monster Hoax

    Loch Ness Monster Hoax
  • Tourists Watch the Loch Ness Monster

    Tourists Watch the Loch Ness Monster
17 image entries
Register to post comments and participate in contests.
This contest is fueled by the following news: Dinsdale's Film: In 1960, Tim Dinsdale, an aeronautical engineer, filmed the lake from the air, recording the movement of a huge and long creature in the waters. In preparation to answer the anticipated arguments of critics, for comparison, Dinsdale filmed the foamy trace, left behind his boat. Independent experts from British Joint Intelligence Center of Aeronautics (JARIC) came to a conclusion that, the film was genuine depicting the movement of "living object", swimming at 16 km/h speed. For many years, Dinsdale's film was considered to be the main and only convincing evidence of the existence of a gigantic living creature in the lake, but in 2005, JARIC experts re-reviewed their report and declared that, the filmed effect is nothing more than a foam trace, left by something that swam shortly before the boat. This report led to a wave of protests. According to Professor Henry Bauer from Virginia Polytechnic, USA: "The motion of the boat, filmed by Dinsdale for comparison, several computer examinations, additional examination by Kodak experts and the initial report of JARIC, serve as conclusive evidence that there could be no discussion on the trace, left behind by the boat". Sonar scanning: Disappointed with the effectiveness of visual image studies, researchers turned to other methods of searching, in particular, using sonar scanning. Researchers used this method for the first time in the mid 50s and since then, they have been working on this continuously. Thus, researchers have learned many new things about the Loch Ness lake, in particular, they calculated the total quantity of biomass in the lake – the key factor, which has a direct relationship to the possibility of the existence of a large creature in this lake. Also, sonar studies revealed the existence of the Seiche's effect in the lake, which can also be the cause of optical illusions. The discussion is about the sudden occurrence of powerful and short-lived water waves, triggered by abrupt changes in atmospheric pressure. These currents can drag huge objects, which, while moving against the wind, can create an illusion of forward movement "on their own". But the same sonar scanning revealed some other unexplainable facts. It was considered that, gigantic objects, capable of coming up, descending and manoeuvring in waters, existed deep in the lake. However, researchers could not answer the question about what type of objects they could be. Nessiteras rhombopteryx: In 1972, a team of experts, led by Dr. Robert Rines, an American researcher from the Academy of Applied Sciences, conducted a series of experiments using a combination of sonar and photographic equipment. During the experiments, the team managed to shoot strange images, one of which – a giant diamond-shaped fin, which became a huge sensation after being published in 1975. Dr. Rines and Sir Peter Scott, an English naturalist, jointly proposed to give a scientific name to "Nessie": Nessiteras rhombopteryx ( from the Greek: "Nessie monster with diamond shaped fins"). There were sceptics too, who not only questioned the results of the computer processing of sound and photographic research but also used the scientific term "anagram" for it: "Monster hoax by Sir Peter.S". Researcher Adrian Shine, a veteran of the Loch Ness Project, was skeptical of the discoveries by Rines, but he at least ruled out the possibility of an intentional fraud. "In my opinion, the researchers only misinterpreted the image of the lake bed and some objects, captured by the camera lens" - stated Shine. Shine, who conducted the psychological experiments (during which, for example, a column surfaced from the water in front of group of researchers), is convinced that self-suggestion plays an important role. But " …it does not explain all the strange things, observed by researchers". In 2003, a team of experts, engaged by the BBC, conducted a complete investigation of the lake employing 600 acoustic reflectors but it did not find anything unusual in the lake. But three years later, new documentary evidence appeared, explaining some unexplainable happenings in the lake. Gordon Holmes video: In May 2007, Gordon Holmes, an amateur researcher, decided to fix microphones in the lake and explore the sounds, emanating from the deep waters. He observed strange movement inside the waters on the western shore of the lake and shot a video, showing the movement of a long dark object inside the waters, heading towards north of the lake. Mostly, the body of the creature remained under the water but its head emerged above the surface from time to time, leaving a foamy trail. After a few days, fragments of video were flashed on TV news channels across the world. Experts, after studying the video, confirmed its authenticity and came to the conclusion that, the creature was about 15m long and moved at 10 km/h speed. However, Holmes' video was not considered to be conclusive evidence about the existence of a prehistoric lake monster. Opinions appeared, suggesting that it could be a giant water snake or worm, optical illusion or log, set in motion by internal currents.