Loch Ness Hoax

Contest Info

  • Started: 8/22/2009 13:00
  • Ended: 8/25/2009 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 22
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Loch Ness Hoax
Contest Directions: Nessie (Loch Ness Monster) is one of the most valuable legends in tourism industry attracting over a million visitors a year to Loch Ness. While most of the photo and video evidence of Nessie turned out to be a hoax or wishful thinking, tens of thousands of Nessie-searching enthusiasts come to the Loch Ness lake every year with sophisticated video equipment hoping to catch Nessie on camera.
In this contest you are asked to show how Loch Mess Monster hoax could have been created. Was it photoshop editing of swimming elephant, or perhaps a diver holding a puppet monster? Tell us your version of how Nessie might be created.

Contest Info

    • Started: 8/22/2009 13:00
    • Ended: 8/25/2009 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 22
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
22 pictures
  • Loch Ness Hoax is a Hippo Water Cab

    Loch Ness Hoax is a Hippo Water Cab
  • Big Foot with Inflatable Loch Ness Monster

    Big Foot with Inflatable Loch Ness Monster
  • Motorized Loch Ness Monster

    Motorized Loch Ness Monster
  • Submarine Loch Ness Monster

    Submarine Loch Ness Monster
  • Towing the Loch Ness Monster

    Towing the Loch Ness Monster
  • My Dog Nessie, the Loch Ness Monster

    My Dog Nessie, the Loch Ness Monster
  • Rusty Loch Ness Monster

    Rusty Loch Ness Monster
  • Faking Loch Ness Monster Images

    Faking Loch Ness Monster Images
  • Mr Bean with Loch Ness Monster

    Mr Bean with Loch Ness Monster
  • Dinosaur Diver

    Dinosaur Diver
22 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Satellite Images: In the summer of 2009, a British citizen reported that he spotted an unknown creature while viewing satellite images on the Google Earth site. Something, which when seen from a distance, resembling a large sea animal with two pairs of fins and a tail, was actually visible on the images from Google Earth. For and against arguments: One of the main arguments that skeptics have been citing is the undeniable fact, that the quantity of biomass, available in the lake is not enough to support any living being of such size, which presumably the Loch Ness monster has. Despite its huge size and abundance of water (as seven rivers merge into it), the Loch Ness Lake does not have much flora and fauna. Tens of species of living creatures were identified during the studies conducted under Loch Ness Project. However, sonar scans have established that the lake has only 20 tons of biomass, which is sufficient to support the life of one living creature, weighing no more than 2 tons. Estimates, based on the study of plesiosaur fossils, have established that the 15m long lizard could weigh 25 tons. Adrian Shine believes that the search should be conducted not only for one creature but for a "colony, which could consist of 15 to 30 individual animals". In that case, all of these should be no more than 1.5m long so as to feed themselves. Henry Bauer, a professor at Virginia Polytechnic, one of the main supporters of the existence of "Nessie", is not convinced by this argument. He maintains: "Dinsdale's video convincingly proves that a giant creature really lived in the lake at least in the 60s. Moreover, I am convinced that one giant monster exists here or had existed. Existence of another one is not clear. Everything points to the fact that oxygen is a must for the existence of this creature. But, it hardly emerges onto the surface. If all the testimonies of witnesses are summed up, describing a huge creature with a hump, fins and long neck, we end up depicting an image of a modern plesiosaur. But these creatures, living in Loch Ness, do not come onto the surface and spend most of their lives deep in the lake. This means that we may be dealing with a descendant of plesiosaur, which, with time, could have developed an ability to survive without air for long periods". Supporters of the existence of "Nessie" refer to ancient legends, according to which there is a network of caves and tunnels in the lake bed, enabling the monster to appear in the lake and return back. However, studies of the lake bed and shores have not found the existence of any such tunnels. Versions: The majority of the supporters of the monster's existence considered it to be a relict plesiosaur, but the remains of a dead body of this creature could not be found during the 70 years of research. Doubts were raised about the viewing of the animal by Saint Columba in the book "Life of Columba", written by Adomnan in the 7th century. Plesiosaurs were the inhabitants of warm tropical seas and the possibility of their existence in the cold waters of Loch Ness raises sufficient doubts. There have also been the hypotheses about cryptids, animals unknown to science (e.g. huge fish, long-necked seal, giant shellfish). Other versions about the origin of Nessie were also proposed, not requiring hypothesis about relict or living creatures, unknown to science. Version 1: In 2005, Neil Clark, the curator of palaeontology at the Museum of University of Glasgow, compared the first reliable sightings of the monster to a touring schedule of nomadic circus folk on their way to Inverness. Clark is of the view that, the local residents did not see prehistoric dinosaurs but bathing elephants. He came to the conclusion that, most of the reports about Nessie belonged to 1933 and subsequent years. It was during this period that a nomadic circus had stopped near the lake on their way to Inverness. Clark believes that the first sightings and photographs of Nessie were that of bathing and swimming elephants. When an elephant swims, it protrudes its trunk onto the surface. Also, two "humps" were visible on the surface the crown of the head and top of the elephant's back. The photo is very similar to descriptions and photos of Nessie. Only later, as Clark believes, Bertram Mills, owner of the Bertram Mills Circus group, offered a huge reward (₤ 20000 or ₤ 1 million in terms of present day amounts) to those who could catch Nessie for him. However, this version does not divulge all sighting cases. Version 2: According to the opinion of Luigi Piccardi, an Italian seismologist, there is a huge tectonic fault called Great Glen at the bottom of the lake. According to him, huge waves on the surface of the lake as well as gigantic bubbles rising from its bottom are nothing but a result of tectonic activity on the lake bed. All this, as maintained by Piccardi, may be accompanied by emission of flames, characteristic sounds, reminiscent of a muted roar and also may lead to weak earthquakes, which are mistaken for the monster.