If Turkeys Ruled

Contest Info

  • Started: 11/22/2011 11:00
  • Ended: 11/25/2011 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 21
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
If Turkeys Ruled
Contest Directions: Thanksgiving is just around the corner. Statistics show that the United States produces about 270 million turkeys a year, 30% of these turkeys are consumed by Americans during Thanksgiving. Turkeys have a sharp 270 degree vision, and are quite "sporty" birds - they run up to 20 miles per hour and fly up to 55 miles per hour. Turkeys are related to pheasants. Benjamin Franklin wanted the national bird to be a turkey, instead of the bald eagle. Let's pay a tribute to this bird today.
Photoshop what life would be like if turkeys ruled the world. Here's a good example by JannaR.

Contest Info

    • Started: 11/22/2011 11:00
    • Ended: 11/25/2011 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 21
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
21 pictures
  • Cyborg Turkey

    Cyborg Turkey
  • Steampunk Turkey Solider

    Steampunk Turkey Solider
  • Barack Obama the Smoked Turkey

    Barack Obama the Smoked Turkey
  • Mafia Turkeys

    Mafia Turkeys
  • Joe Biden the Chef with a Cooked Obama Turkey

    Joe Biden the Chef with a Cooked Obama Turkey
  • Michelle Obama with Barack Obama Turkey at the White House

    Michelle Obama with Barack Obama Turkey at the White House
  • Turkey Lady

    Turkey Lady
  • Turkey in a Cloak

    Turkey in a Cloak
  • Turkey Protests Sprayed by Police

    Turkey Protests Sprayed by Police
  • BusinessTurkey in a Rocket

    BusinessTurkey in a Rocket
21 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: The domesticated turkey (Meleagris gallopavo Linnaeus) is one of the most common domesticated bird types, belonging to the Galliformes order and which has its origin from the common turkey. Origin and history of domestication: The domestication of the common turkey was started in the New World, where aboriginals domesticated wild turkey long back before the discovery of America by the Europeans. In 1519, Turkeys were brought to Spain (called "Spanish Hens") and after several years, the turkeys spread to France, England and to Europe. Another ancient name of turkey, the "Turkey Hen", which the bird got its name in English, the "Turkey"). Appearance: Turkeys are the largest domesticated birds. The live weight of the adult turkey cocks is 9 - 35 kg while the turkey hens weight ranges from 4.5 - 11 kg. Turkeys have strong and long legs and a broad tail. Characteristic skin formations ("corals") are found on the head and neck and a fleshy appendage, which reaches up to 12-15 cm during the excitation period, is found in males on the upper portion of the beak. Feathering can be white, bronze, black and other colors based on the species and breeds. Breeding and keeping: Turkeys in general, and in particular young ones are very sensitive to cold and humidity and therefore, the turkey bird breeding in private farms is successful only in warm and moderate, dry climates, where the birds can be kept in well caulked and even heating poultry farms, protected from cold winds. The trapdoor for the exit of birds from the premises are arranged in the wall at a height of 10-15 cm from floor level on the southern side of the poultry farm. The yard near the poultry farm, where the turkeys are released, should be spacious since the turkeys as do geese love spaciousness and one cannot guarantee the birds health without a proper hen run. So that the turkeys lose their flying capability, the wings are cut (advisable), or high poultry yards are made or the birds are kept in closed premises. Since the turkey birds are distinguished by a quarrelsome nature, it is advisable to keep no more than 30 - 35 turkey hens with 3 - 4 turkey cocks in a poultry farm (8-12 turkey hens per 1 turkey cock). A perch, from wooden logs with a thickness and width of 73 cm and a gap of 35 - 40 cm between the logs, is made at a height of 90 - 100 cm from floor level in the poultry yard; the following dimensions are set for turkey nests: width - 60 cm, depth - 60 cm, heigh - 60 cm, threshold height - 15 cm. Five laying hens are kept in a single nest. A turkey hen of over five years of age and a turkey cock of over four years of age are not suitable for breeding. To protect the birds from feather parasites, it is recommended to arrange ash tubs in the form of a wooden box with a size of 125 x 80 x 25 cm, which is sprinkled with fine sand and wooden ash (in 1:1 ratio). The tub should be replenished with a mixture of fine sand and ash as and when the tub contents diminish. In industrial conditions, the maintenance of turkeys and raising of young is done mainly in broad-sized window-free poultry yards (with an adjustable micro-climate and lighting) on matting or in cubicles. Turkey breeds: Ancient: Several breeds are reared in farms; in the olden days, the main attention was given to the quantity while the feathering and color of feathers were given secondary importance. The following breeds belong to the ancient category: Norfolk Black or Spanish Black, in which the feathers on the tail and back are in a dark brown color with a green tint and turkey chicks have white spots near the neck region; legs are black, they are of average height, weight ranges from 15-18 kg (in common wild turkeys - 5 - 10 kg). Raised in Norfolk County in Eastern England from turkeys, brought from Spain in the beginning of the 16th century. Cambridge or Holland Turkeys - black feathering with blue, very striking tint; chickens have grey - brown spots. Varieties: bronze (copper color), reddish brown, grey and white, sometimes with black-ended feathers on the tail. In olden days, a white variety of turkeys was preferred over others for breeding in France due to a significant tenderness and tasty meat. The oldest variety - Cambridge bronze, which were originally known as the Norfolk bronze, which have the same origin as that of the Norfolk Black. Starting from the 17th century, both the breeds were available in the London markets whereas a flock of turkeys, legs of which were coated with resin, were brought to London. Broad-breasted Bronze or American Bronze - well-built with brown feathering with bronze, violet and purple shades; weight ranges from 12 - 18 kg. Crested Turkey with a fleecey, standing crest with a length of up to 15 - 18 cm on the head in turkey hens and a hanging crest in turkey cocks. Bourbon Red; Narragansett; Blue Slate; Royal Palm.