If Pirates Ruled

Contest Info

  • Started: 9/17/2012 06:00
  • Ended: 9/20/2012 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 27
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
If Pirates Ruled
Contest Directions: This Wednesday, September 19, is "International Talk Like a Pirate Day." 'Celebrations' of this Day started 1995 by John Baur ("Ol' Chumbucket") and Mark Summers ("Cap'n Slappy"), of the United States, who declared that on this day everyone should talk like a true pirate. The parodic tradition caught on and turned into a yearly holiday, to the great joy of the pirate fans all over the world. So remember when you see your co-worker or a boss today, instead of usual "Hello" greet them with "Ahoy, me hearty!"
Photoshop how people and life would be different if pirates ruled the world. Think of pirate cars, animals, money, and of course pirate politicians and celebrities. Arrrrr, photoshop, mateys!

Contest Info

    • Started: 9/17/2012 06:00
    • Ended: 9/20/2012 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 27
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
27 pictures
  • Sarah Palin the Pirate

    Sarah Palin the Pirate
  • Pirate In Chief Barack Obama with Joe Biden the Baseball Player

    Pirate In Chief Barack Obama with Joe Biden the Baseball Player
  • Mitt Romney and the GOP Pirates of the Potomac

    Mitt Romney and the GOP Pirates of the Potomac
  • Global Piracy

    Global Piracy
  • Space Pirates

    Space Pirates
  • Lord of Pirates Barack Obama

    Lord of Pirates Barack Obama
  • JAY-Z Looking for the Black Pearl

    JAY-Z Looking for the Black Pearl
  • Barack Obama the Pirate with his Treasure

    Barack Obama the Pirate with his Treasure
  • Captain Ben Bernanke Burning Money

    Captain Ben Bernanke Burning Money
  • Queen Elizabeth the Pirate

    Queen Elizabeth the Pirate
27 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Modern piracy: Main regions of attacks: * South-East Asia & South China Sea (Malacca Strait, Indonesia, Philippines & Thailand). * Western Africa (Nigeria, Senegal, Angola, Ghana). * East Africa (India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Somalia, Tanzania) * South America & Indian Ocean, Caribbean Sea (Brazil, Columbia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Guyana) Specialization exists amongst the pirates: surveillance, capture groups, land security, negotiators. Around 10% of the ransom is distributed amongst local elderly people, politicians and society. Somali pirates are modern armed groups, who capture the sea ships from the shores of Somalia with an aim to demand a ransom. They use small displacement vessels (boats, motor boats, fishing boats) as means of transport. Pirates are armed, as a rule, with automatic weapons and grenade launchers. Somali pirates are often unorganized but sometimes, they have quality preparation. Armed patrolling is undertaken by the naval forces of Russia, India, NATO member countries and others for providing safe navigation of ships in the operating zone of pirates. Composition of groups: The majority of pirates are young people of around 20 - 35 years of age from Puntland, the self-proclaimed autonomous state on the North-East side of Somalia. According to the estimations of the Association for rendering assistance to Western African seamen, at least five major pirate gangs, consisting of around 1000 armed pirates exist. According to BBC information, pirates are divided into the following categories of persons: * Local fishermen, who are inducted in piracy, since they very well know the sea conditions. * Former military personnel, who took part in the internal wars of Somalia in the composition of local clans and having battle experience. * Experts, who can operate the technology, in particular, with GPS equipment. Reasons behind the emergence of piracy: Since 1991, Somalia ceased to exist as a centralized state, which is divided into zones, the influence by local rulers and whatever centralized economy and financial system it had, stopped functioning since then. Piracy is the main source of income for the local population. It is not a very difficult task to organize a well equipped raider group in a country, which is saturated with arms. Local authorities (field commanders and tribal leaders) are not interested in any action against the piracy since it will not have an impact on their international status. Field commanders either turn a blind eye on the piracy industry or take part in it. The frequency of attacks of the pirates on merchant ships have increased on the shores of Somalia. Routes for ships, traveling from the Persian Gulf and Asian countries to the Mediterranean through the Suez Canal and and also vessels, coming from/to port (s) off the Indian coast of Africa, lie off the coast of Somalia. By taking the extensive trade links of Asian and European countries into account, large fleets of vessels with valuable cargo have a potential threat of being captured. In this region, piracy started growing since 2004 and at a very brisk pace. The International Maritime Bureau reports that, as on December 7, more than 100 attacks on merchant ships were registered in the waters of Somalia since the beginning of 2008. During this period, pirates were successful in capturing 40 vessels out of which, 13 were yet to be freed. Around 268 persons from different countries are under captivity in the hands of pirates. During the period between the 10th and 16th of November 2008, around 11 incidents were registered in this region with three vessels being hijacked and four more incidents were reported, in which counter attack was undertaken. Despite the use of quite powerful arms and even grenade launchers, not a single seaman died in the hands of pirates. This is due to the poor preparation and intentional tactics to pirates, who understand that till they shed blood, stern action will not be taken against them. Due to these reasons, pirates are not strict towards their hostages - seamen and the ransom is demanded from corporations, companies and owners of the cargo and vessels. On the other hand, international forces and special units of countries, who had sent their naval forces to the coasts of Somalia, often open destruction fire. International reactions: On October 7, 2008, the UN Security Council passed a resolution No 1838. It allows the countries to use naval and air forces for fighting the pirates in the Somalia region. Operation Atlanta was undertaken by the EU on December 8, 2008. The combined Task Force 151 was formed in January 2009 to combat the attacks of pirates. Around 500 pirates from Somalia were captured but 2/3 of them were later released. In April 2010, the resolution was unanimously passed by the UN Security Council on taking effective criminal action against piracy. In it, the UN General Secretary is given a three month period to submit a report on possible criminal proceedings against pirates. Economic consequences: With every year, the loss due to the activities of pirates from Somalia is increasing. The ransom amounts considerably increased since they are interconnected with the sizes of captured vessels. Earlier, the ransom amount did not exceed 500,000 USD but presently, it is approximately 5 million USD. The changing pattern of annual loss due to the pirates of Somalia can be seen with respect to years.