How to Quit Smoking

Contest Info

  • Started: 5/31/2012 05:00
  • Ended: 6/3/2012 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 23
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
How to Quit Smoking
Contest Directions: World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) is observed around the world every year on May 31. It is meant to encourage a 24-hour period of abstinence from all forms of tobacco consumption across the globe. The day is further intended to draw global attention to the widespread prevalence of tobacco use and to negative health effects. There are over 48 million adult smokers in the U.S., 70% of whom said they wanted to quit according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. Only 5% to 10% of smokers are successful on any given attempt and it takes smokers five or more tries to end their addiction for good.
All the studies today point to tobacco as being unhealthy. We all know at least some relatives or friends that smoke cigarettes and if we believe the researchers, we want them to quit. Photoshop any methods (devices, programs, example situations, posters, billboards, etc.) to help people quit smoking. You can also show alternatives or substitutes for cigarettes that will help smokers break the habit.

Contest Info

    • Started: 5/31/2012 05:00
    • Ended: 6/3/2012 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 23
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
This gallery only contains our top 23 selections from its parent contest How to Quit Smoking. All 23 contest pictures can be viewed here.
  • Smoker Turning to Ash Smoking a Cigarette

    Smoker Turning to Ash Smoking a Cigarette
  • Christ Carrying a Cigarette Cross

    Christ Carrying a Cigarette Cross
  • Smoking Sam's Grave

    Smoking Sam's Grave
  • Smoking is a Ticking Time Bomb

    Smoking is a Ticking Time Bomb
  • Smoking Woman Married To Death

    Smoking Woman Married To Death
  • Cigarette in a Mouse Trap

    Cigarette in a Mouse Trap
  • Skull on the End of a Cigarette

    Skull on the End of a Cigarette
  • Nicotine Injection Pump Failed

    Nicotine Injection Pump Failed
  • Give Up Smoking by Will Power

    Give Up Smoking by Will Power
  • Barack Obama Smoking with Friends

    Barack Obama Smoking with Friends
  • Marlboro Smoking Country

    Marlboro Smoking Country
  • Man in a Stop Smoking Chamber

    Man in a Stop Smoking Chamber
  • Smokers Coffin

    Smokers Coffin
  • Loading a Cigarette in a Gun

    Loading a Cigarette in a Gun
  • Stop Smoking Billboard

    Stop Smoking Billboard
  • Man in the Graveyard on a Cigarette

    Man in the Graveyard on a Cigarette
  • Smoking Butts

    Smoking Butts
  • Anti-Smoking Death Ray Robot

    Anti-Smoking Death Ray Robot
  • Doctor Recommended Cigarettes

    Doctor Recommended Cigarettes
  • Woman on an Anti Smoking Machine

    Woman on an Anti Smoking Machine
  • The Other Alternative to Smoking

    The Other Alternative to Smoking
  • Man Smoking a Burning Cigar

    Man Smoking a Burning Cigar
  • Halle Berry Smoking

    Halle Berry Smoking
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This contest is fueled by the following news: A well-to-do intellectual person has fewer chances of surviving than a nonsmoking low-paid worker of the same gender. This is the conclusion of British researchers from NHS Health Scotland and specialists from the University of Glasgow. The results of the research, during which the long-term effect of addiction was studied on 15,000 elderly men and women, demonstrate that smoking has a greater effect on health status than social position. Both among men and women, smokers of all walks of life have a greater risk of premature death than nonsmokers. It is noteworthy that one of the lowest levels of mortality is among nonsmoking women from the lowest classes. Specialists also found that smoking deprives women of an innate genetic advantage over men in life expectancy. According to the authors, neither wealth nor being female can offer protection against the toxicity of tobacco. But there is also a positive observation: the mortality rate of those who quit smoking is almost the same as those who never touched a cigarette. Thus, kicking the chronic habit has a beneficial effect on people regardless of their social standing. It is simpler to quit smoking for money. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in the United States established that people who are offered several hundred dollar to quit smoking are three times more often stuck in addiction than those who don't receive monetary compensation. Smoking increases the risk of baldness in men, and this applies even to Asian men who are less likely to go bald than Caucasian men. The risk of a stroke in girls who smoke is twice greater than in nonsmokers, and in women who smoke 40 cigarettes a day, the risk is ten times higher. Furthermore, Alzheimer's disease and various forms of dementia develop far more frequently in smokers than in nonsmokers. For all the unconditional harm of smoking, for people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis smoking cigarettes can lead to positive results, in particular, it can slow progression of the disease, so concluded Swiss scientists who published a report in the July issue of the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases; it was cited by Reuters. Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease of connective tissue and clinically manifests itself as a chronic progressive affection of joints. When joints are affected, patients develop proliferative changes in the synovial lining and joint capsule and destruction of the articular cartilage and adjacent bone. When joints of the hand are affected, a so-called rheumatoid hand forms. Patients complain of feeling morning stiffness, pain, swelling of the joints, and high tissue temperature. Rheumatoid arthritis often leads to systemic affection of serous membranes, lungs, heart, vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nervous system. Smoking tobacco is thought to lead to the development of rheumatoid arthritis. However, having examined the state of health of 2000 patients aged 50 years and older with rheumatoid arthritis, the authors of the report discovered an unexpected oddity. There were 1459 nonsmokers, 489 moderate smokers, and 55 were heavy smokers, consuming more than a pack of cigarettes a day. As it turned out, development of the disease in moderate smokers and nonsmokers occurred at about the same rate, as shown by X-rays over the course of the three-year period of observations. But in the third group where there were only heavy smokers, the disease progressed at a slower rate. "Potentially, this may be due to the anti-inflammatory properties of nicotine," suggests Dr. Axel Finckh of the University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland. However, for now it is impossible to determine whether it is smoking that affects the course of the disease. The authors of the report theorize that smoking is more "guilty" in development of the disease than in its progression; however, further research is needed for confirming this theory. In any case, Finckh emphasizes that the risks to the smoker's cardiovascular system far outweigh nicotine's anti-inflammatory properties.
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