How to Quit Smoking

Contest Info

  • Started: 4/19/2011 11:20
  • Ended: 4/22/2011 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 22
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
How to Quit Smoking
Contest Directions: President Obama has quit smoking, and has been smoke free for almost a year now said the First Lady Michelle Obama recently. "He always wanted to stop, but never succeeded until now", said Michelle. Quitting was a "personal challenge" for the commander in chief, and he's now proudly calling himself "a former smoker". There are over 48 million adult smokers in the U.S., 70% of whom said they wanted to quit according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. Only 5% to 10% of smokers are successful on any given attempt and it takes smokers five or more tries to end their addiction for good.
All the studies today point to tobacco as being unhealthy. We all know at least some relatives or friends that smoke cigarettes and if we believe the researchers, we want them to quit. Photoshop any methods (devices, programs, example situations, posters, billboards, etc.) to help people quit smoking. You can also show alternatives or substitutes for cigarettes that will help smokers break the habit.

Contest Info

    • Started: 4/19/2011 11:20
    • Ended: 4/22/2011 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 22
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
This gallery only contains our top 22 selections from its parent contest How to Quit Smoking. All 22 contest pictures can be viewed here.
  • How Barack Obama Quit Smoking

    How Barack Obama Quit Smoking
  • Reasons to Quit Smoking

    Reasons to Quit Smoking
  • Dead Smoking Girl

    Dead Smoking Girl
  • Stop Smoking and See Better

    Stop Smoking and See Better
  • Frankenstein Smoking

    Frankenstein Smoking
  • Quititing Smoking Makes You Crazy

    Quititing Smoking Makes You Crazy
  • Celebrity Smokers Cemetery

    Celebrity Smokers Cemetery
  • Windows Stop Smoking Message

    Windows Stop Smoking Message
  • Smoking Kills

    Smoking Kills
  • Quit Smoking Wear T-Shirts

    Quit Smoking Wear T-Shirts
  • Stop Smoking Advert with Skull

    Stop Smoking Advert with Skull
  • Evolution of Smoking

    Evolution of Smoking
  • Barack Obama Says Smokers Are Losers

    Barack Obama Says Smokers Are Losers
  • McDonalds Cigarette Death Menu

    McDonalds Cigarette Death Menu
  • Grim Reaper Stop Smoking Advert

    Grim Reaper Stop Smoking Advert
  • Underwater Quit Smoking Theraphy

    Underwater Quit Smoking Theraphy
  • Person Buried in Smokers Ash Tray

    Person Buried in Smokers Ash Tray
  • Barack Obama Quit Smoking

    Barack Obama Quit Smoking
  • Old Woman Smoking Painting

    Old Woman Smoking Painting
  • Quit Smoking Tombstone

    Quit Smoking Tombstone
  • Keep Smoking and We Will Sponsor Your Funeral

    Keep Smoking and We Will Sponsor Your Funeral
  • Cut Off Your Head

    Cut Off Your Head
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Reuters, citing the data of the Cork University Hospital, reports that in Ireland the number of heart attacks dropped 11% after smoking was banned in public places. The conclusions of Edmond Cronin and his colleagues are based on data on the number of heart attack patients brought to hospitals in southwestern Ireland. These data show a 11% decrease in patients of this category compared to the previous year. Recall that the smoking ban in public places in Ireland was introduced in March 2004. However, three years passed before the first real results appeared. Dutch scientists, whose article was published in the journal Neurology and cited by Reuters, concluded that Alzheimer's disease and various forms of dementia develop far more often in smokers than in nonsmokers. Scientists at the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam examined the health status of about 7000 persons aged 55 years and older. The observations were carried out for seven years. It turned out that during this time various forms of dementia and Alzheimer's disease developed in 706 patients. These diseases were found 50% more often in smokers older than 55 years than in nonsmokers and in those who had quit smoking, emphasizes Dr. Monique Breteler, the report's principal author. It is known that the APOE4 (apolipoprotein E4) gene increases the risk of developing dementia. As the Dutch investigators stress, smoking doesn't affect in any way those people who carry this gene. The risk of their developing dementia is already sufficiently great without this. On the other hand, if a smoker doesn't have the APOE4 gene, smoking increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's by 70%. This is not surprising. Smoking leads to the development of blood clots, plaques, in the smoker's blood. They close off the lumen of vessels supplying blood to the brain, and this becomes the cause of dementia. "Furthermore, smoking increases the risk of a stroke, which also becomes the cause of dementia," emphasizes Breteler. Another cause of how smoking affects the development of dementia is that, during smoking, vascular cells are subjected to strong oxidative stress, a process in which cells are damaged as a result of oxidation. According to Breteler, oxidative stress leads to thickening of artery walls. Precisely it is the cause or important component of many serious diseases such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, as well as aging. Alzheimer's disease and dementia are not the only consequences of tobacco consumption. Today already every tenth adult older than 40 years suffers from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), a chronic obstructive disease of the lungs, which is also caused by smoking. For now COPD, according to the data of American researchers, is only in fifth place among the most common causes of death worldwide. However, according to forecasts, this disease already by 2020 will rank third in this gloomy rating. Researchers at the National Taiwan University in Taipei found that smoking causes an increased risk of balding in men and this applies even to Asian men who are less susceptible to hair loss than Caucasian men. Reuters cites their study in the journal Archives of Dermatology. The authors of the report investigated the health status of 740 Thai males whose average age was 65 years. They found that if patents smoked 20 or more cigarettes a day, in many cases this led to moderate or considerable loss of hair on their head. Doctors explain this by the fact that smoking destroys hair follicles (folliculus pili) in which is the hair root. The excretory duct of the sebaceous gland empties precisely into the cutaneous follicle approximately at the boundary of the outer and middle third of the hair. Smoking disrupts the circulation of blood and hormones in scalp skin and increases the production of the "female" hormone estrogen. In this connection, doctors suggest that men who began to lose hair early start to think about a healthy living style and give up smoking. Balding is not the only consequence of smoking. Smokers far more frequently than nonsmokers develop Alzheimer's disease and various forms of dementia, which also it not surprising. After all, it is smoking that leads to the formation of blood clots, plaques, in the smoker's blood. They block the lumen of vessels supplying blood to the brain, and this also becomes the cause of dementia. Furthermore, smoking increases the risk of a stroke.
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