Coconut

Contest Info

  • Started: 3/5/2008 06:00
  • Ended: 3/9/2008 06:00
  • Level: apprentice
  • Entries: 36
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Apprentice 1st Place $5
  • FN Apprentice 2nd Place $3
  • FN Apprentice 3rd Place $2
Coconut
Contest Directions: Photoshop this coconut image any way you wish. Examples may include merging this coconut with some with some fruits, vegetables, objects or animals; placing the coconut into some environment, movies, paintings. These are just some ideas.
You have 3 days to submit your entry. Submitting it early will give you plenty of time to read the critique comments and edit your image accordingly.
Many thanks to Scott Liddell and Morguefile for providing the source image.

Contest Info

    • Started: 3/5/2008 06:00
    • Ended: 3/9/2008 06:00
    • Level: apprentice
    • Entries: 36
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Apprentice 1st Place $5
    • FN Apprentice 2nd Place $3
    • FN Apprentice 3rd Place $2
36 pictures
  • Chicken Coconut Family

    Chicken Coconut Family
  • Coconut Money Box

    Coconut Money Box
  • Coconut Easter egg

    Coconut Easter egg
  • Coconut Brain

    Coconut Brain
  • Florida Coconut Tree

    Florida Coconut Tree
  • Coconut Spilling Milk

    Coconut Spilling Milk
  • Coconut Egg

    Coconut Egg
  • Coconut Chick Hatches

    Coconut Chick Hatches
  • Girl Selling Coconuts

    Girl Selling Coconuts
  • Coconut Asteroid Belt

    Coconut Asteroid Belt
36 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: The coconut palm (Latin Cocos nucifera) is a plant, belonging to the palm family; a unique species of the genus Cocos. The coconut is one of the few plants, whose scientific names do not go back to Greek roots. It originates from the Portuguese coco, "monkey", and is given because of the stains on the nut, which makes the nut look like a muzzle of a monkey. The specific name is nucifera from the Latin. nux - nut and ferre - to bear. Origin and distribution: The native land of the coconut palm tree is precisely unknown - presumably, it comes from South East Asia (Malaysia). Now it is available everywhere in the tropics of both hemispheres, both in cultural as well as in a wild-growing kind. It has been cultivated in the Philippines, the Malaysian archipelago, the Malay Peninsula, in India and Sri Lanka since prehistoric times. The coconut is a plant on marine shores, preferring sandy soils. Expansion of its growth area was helped by human beings and in a natural manner: coconuts are water-proof and freely float on water and are easily carried far by ocean currents and also keep their vitality. External appearance: A tall (up to 27-30m) slim palm tree. The trunk is 15-45cm in diameter, smooth, in rings from dead leaves, is slightly inclined and wide at the base. Lateral branches are not present but brace roots often grow at the bottom. The leaves are pinnate, dense 3-6m in length. Small yellowish unisex blossoms are collected in cones, i.e., in turn - alar panicles (length 1.2 - 2m), overhanging from the tree top. The fruit is the coconut, which is a drupaceous fruit, 15-30cm long and rather round, weighing 1.5-2.5 kg. The outer cover of the fruit (exocarp) is penetrated by fibers (coir); internal (endocarp) a firm "shell", with 3 interstices, leading to 3 seed buds, of which only one develops into a seed. The seed consists of a fleshy white colored surface in thickness of approximately 12mm (pulp or palm nut) and endosperm. The endosperm, at first, is transparent liquid (coconut water) with oil drops in it, which is extracted by the palm nut, and gradually turning into a milk color emulsion (coconut milk) and then gets denser and harder. The fruits grow in groups consisting of 15-20 pieces. The fruits completely ripen within 8-10 months. During cultivation, the tree starts to fructify from 7-9 years and continues approximately till 50 years. Annually, one tree yields from 60 to 120 nuts. Nuts are collected when they are completely ripe (for the palm nut and other products) or one month prior to maturing (for coir). They are wrongly called nuts: actually, they are not nuts but drupes - drupaceous fruits such as cherries or peaches. Use: The coconut palm tree is one of tens of plants, which are most valuable for human beings. Somehow or another, all parts of the coconut tree are used. The ripe endosperm (pulp) contains oils, mineral substances and vitamins. It is eaten raw or dried, which is later on used as additives in confectionery products and karri. The palm nut is also a valuable raw material for obtaining fat coconut oil, which is further used in the manufacture of bathing soaps, candles and margarine. Traditionally, the palm nut is obtained by arranging the split coconuts in places, illuminated by the sun for drying purposes. After some time, the dried palm nut is separated and later on pulverized into chips. The remaining oil cake is used for feeding the cattle. Unripe endosperm nuts --sourish - sweet coconut milk (though, it is correct to call it "coconut water") is used for drinking and in cookery. It quenches the thirst very well and contains a considerable quantity of vitamins, minerals and inverted sugars. Coconut water, contained in the nut, is so sterile, that during the Second World War, in case of emergency, it was used for intravenous purposes instead of physiologic saline. Unfortunately, it cannot be stored for long, it cannot be pasteurized and upon heating, it coagulates. An important product prepared from coconuts is coconut milk. It is made by keeping grated pulp in hot water to remove oil and aromatic components. As a result, the milky-white transparent emulsion (17-20 percent fat content) with the sweet coconut smell is obtained. After some time, the fat and water get separated (as in the case of cows milk) and thus, coconut cream is obtained. Coconut milk is an important element in many Asiatic cuisines. Ropes, mats, brushes and so forth are made from the fibers of the fruit shells (coir) and also from the fibers of the leaves. The trunks are fine building materials. The leaves are handed over for weaving and serve as roofing material. Ware is made from the shell of the nuts. Also, coconuts and especially coconut oil, is used in traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory, anti-scorbutic and a diuretic.