Chinese Counterfeits

Contest Info

  • Started: 8/1/2005 06:05
  • Ended: 8/3/2005 06:05
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 20
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
Chinese Counterfeits
Contest Directions: Show us obvious Chinese-made counterfeits by using any popular items (books, audio CD's, footware, electronics, software, clothing, etc). Show the flaws that a counterfeiter might make when trying to reproduce a brand name item.

Contest Info

    • Started: 8/1/2005 06:05
    • Ended: 8/3/2005 06:05
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 20
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
20 pictures
  • Mao

    Mao
  • 3 dollars

    3 dollars
  • photoshop elements

    photoshop elements
  • HOPPER

    HOPPER
  • sneakers

    sneakers
  • Dummies

    Dummies
  • Kitty

    Kitty
  • DVD Movie

    DVD Movie
  • TV

    TV
  • Rolex Watch

    Rolex Watch
20 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Despite the fact that it is unauthorized, that it is missing some paragraphs and that a couple of the facts have been misstated, a Chinese version of "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" was on sale Sunday in Beijing. The book was on sale in China just two weeks after the book appeared in English and almost three months ahead of the planned October launch of the official Chinese-language edition. It appears that impatient Chinese fans also have begun posting their own translations of the popular book online. One reader was so upset about the actual ending of the book as written by J.K. Rowling that he wrote his own and posted it on a university web site. The fantasy series by Rowling is hugely popular in China. The hero of the book is known in China as "Ha-li Bo-te". The authorized translations of five earlier books have sold millions of copies in China. In 2002, an unknown Chinese author produced an entire fake adventure which was entitled "Harry Potter and Leopard-Walk-Up-To-Dragon." Economy of China Though China calls itself a socialist state, its economic development is determined by the market and the engine of economic growth are the private companies. As per the Constitution of China, the private property is "inviolable", and the state property is "sacred". Since 1980 the Chinese economy is growing at an average of 15% a year. Towards the end of the 1990s the rate of economic growth slowed down to 8% per year, but after the entry of the PRC in the WTO in 2001, the inflow of foreign direct investments and expansion in exports have led to a new acceleration. As per the official data, in 2003 the GDP of China grew by 10%, but, according to experts, the GDP could have grown by 10-12%. In 2005, growth in the volume of foreign trade was 23%. The bright indicator of economic growth in the country is the consumption of energy resources. So, for example, oil consumption in China for 40 years since the early 1960s increased by more than 25 times, in 2005 constituting, according to the State statistical bureau of the PRC, 300 million tons. As per the data of OPEC, in 2005 China consumed 6.5 million barrels of oil per day. The domestic production of PRC is about 170 million tons annually. In China, there is no resource base which could allow relying on the growth in oil production that may lead to a gradual increase in the dependence on import. Considering the persistent economic growth, as per the forecasts of Chinese experts, by 2020 the country's requirement for the import of oil will reach 450 million tons. By 2025, the expected consumption of oil in the PRC will be about 710 million tons a year. The oil companies of China, like Sinopec are looking for oil fields and gas outside of the PRC, for example in Russia, Kazakhstan and the countries of Africa and Latin America. The consumption of natural gas in the PRC in 2005 was 50 billion a cubic meter. According to the forecasts, by 2020 the gas consumption will grow to approximately 200 billion cubic meters. The consumption of electricity in 2005 was 2,456 trillion KWh. At the same time, some areas of Northern and Southern China suffer from a shortage of electricity. Economic growth and conditions of population: Since the start of the 21st century, despite economic growth, China is facing a lot of serious economic, ecological and social problems: the difference in the incomes of the rich and poor has increased; the difference in the development of villages and cities, western and eastern, especially in coastal, areas is immense and unemployment has shot-up. There are concerns that in some regions the earth, soil and hydrosphere may be poisoned. Street protests are on the rise in China. In the session of NCP, the prime minister Wen Jiabao while addressing with the program report proposed to lower the rates of economic growth in the country, and the funds released to be channeled for improving the life of farmers and increasing the military budget. Government plans to slow down the rates growth of the GDP of China to 7.5% per year against the present rate of 10 %. The funds released will be used for reducing the gap between the living standard of the urban population and farmers (about 900 million, or 75% of the population). So as not to allow the recurrence of "color revolutions" in the PRC, in 2006 it was planned to spend approximately 340 billion Yuan (around 42 billion dollars) for the development of an agrarian sector, which is 14% more than in 2005. Yuan: Since 1994, the Chinese authorities have maintained the exchange rate of their monetary unit - the Yuan, at the level of 8.28 Yuan's per $1. In recent times, however, China is under increasing pressure from the EU countries, Japan and particularly the USA, insisting on the liberalization of the exchange rate of Yuan. In their opinion, the exchange rate of the Yuan is very low and as a result the Chinese goods have a competitive edge over others. The passive trade balance of the USA with China was approx. $162 billion in 2004, and in the first quarter of 2005 it increased by 40% in comparison to the same period of the previous year. On 21st July 2005, China refused from linking the Yuan to the dollar and raised the rate of the national currency by 2 percent. The exchange rate of the Yuan from now on will be determined by its relation to the basket of different currencies. According to Chinese experts, linking to the basket of currencies will make the exchange rate of the Yuan more sensitive to the world economic situation, but at the same time it will not pose a threat to the stability of the country's financial system. The modern population of China is characterized by upper middle aged people, which is a result of the "one family - one child" policy and the population varies throughout the nation. The population censuses in China were conducted in the years 1953, 1964 and 1982. In 1987 the government appointed the next census for 1990, and subsequently after every 10 years. Results of the census of 1982 counted the population at 1,008, 180, 738 people, and are considered to be more authentic than the results of two preceding censuses (1953 - 582 million). International organizations, including the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) assisted in conducting the census of 1982 by donating 15.6 million dollars.