Butterflies

Contest Info

  • Started: 7/28/2006 06:00
  • Ended: 7/30/2006 06:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 39
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $20
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $12
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $8
Butterflies
Contest Directions: Put butterflies where they don't belong, replace objects with butterflies, or replace butterflies with objects. (Feel free to use famous paintings).

Contest Info

    • Started: 7/28/2006 06:00
    • Ended: 7/30/2006 06:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 39
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $20
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $12
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $8
39 pictures
  • Angel with Butterfly Wings by Bouguereau

    Angel with Butterfly Wings by Bouguereau
  • Butterfly Record Player Needle

    Butterfly Record Player Needle
  • Baby Eating a Butterfly Breakfast

    Baby Eating a Butterfly Breakfast
  • Butterfly Orange on a Tree

    Butterfly Orange on a Tree
  • Butterflies in Bullets

    Butterflies in Bullets
  • Angel Butterflies Design by Escher

    Angel Butterflies Design by Escher
  • Bird with Butterfly Wings

    Bird with Butterfly Wings
  • Woman with Butterfly Glasses

    Woman with Butterfly Glasses
  • Woman Giving a Butterfly a Tattoo

    Woman Giving a Butterfly a Tattoo
  • Hunter Catches a Huge Butterfly

    Hunter Catches a Huge Butterfly
39 image entries
Register to post comments and participate in contests.
This contest is fueled by the following news: Tens of millions of snout butterflies -- scientifically known as Libytheana bachmanii larvata -- have swarmed into South Texas. The snout butterflies have ended up breeding in record profusion in the area. The snout butterflies are rather small, dull colored and have an appendage that allows themselves to attach to branches and look rather like leaves. There is concern that the snout butterflies may end up denuding hackberry trees in Texas. Experts maintain that the population explosion is the result of the drought in the region. The butterflies have thrived in the absence of many of their enemies who have not survived the drought. Generally, there is a 99 percent mortality rate among insects from the egg to adult stage. Even a minor adjustment in these odds can result in a tremendous population explosion. It is not clear why these butterflies are grouping and massing as they have been. Butterflies are not social creatures by nature and do not normally fly in flocks like birds ... and like the snout butterflies have been doing in Texas.