Book Secrets

Contest Info

  • Started: 3/30/2005 06:05
  • Ended: 4/1/2005 06:05
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 15
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
Book Secrets
Contest Directions: What hidden secrets could we find in old books? Create images of how books can be used to hide things or be modified in some way to serve a different purpose, or images of books being used in any unique, unconventional manner.

Contest Info

    • Started: 3/30/2005 06:05
    • Ended: 4/1/2005 06:05
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 15
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
15 pictures
  • Book knife

    Book knife
  • Rattlesnake

    Rattlesnake
  • Juiced

    Juiced
  • Cookbook

    Cookbook
  • Houdini Escapes

    Houdini Escapes
  • Jesse James

    Jesse James
  • 4D Book

    4D Book
  • Micheals Book

    Micheals Book
  • Peek a Boo

    Peek a Boo
  • The Booze Book

    The Booze Book
15 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: It might literally be said that Australian law enforcement officials cracked "The Da Vinci Code." The officers found 12 vials of performance enhancing anabolic steroids within the book; the inside pages having been cut out. A man in Sydney faces two charges of importing the illegal substances into the country. Medieval Manuscripts: The falling of the Roman Empire in the fifth Century AD reduced its cultural influence on the remaining world. In the Western Roman Empire, the traditions of writings using Latin remained in monasteries, as initially the Kassidore in the monastery Vivaria, and later Benedict Nursiski in the 6th century stressed on the importance of the re-writing of texts. This was very much influenced on the importance of books during the medieval period, though that time basically the priesthood only read the books. Prior to the invention and launching of the printing machine, all the books were re-written manually, the result of which the books were very costly and rarely. There were four types of scriveners: Copyist - they were involved in mass production and correspondence; Calligrapher - who were involved in the production of important books; Correctors - who were involved in the comparison and matching of completed books with a manuscript, from which it was copied; Painters - who were drawing red color letters; Illustrators - who made the illustrations. Irish monks introduced spaces between the words in the 7th century. This was made easy for reading, as they did not know Latin well. But up to the 12th century, spaces could not get wide usage. There were assumptions that the switchover to the usage of spaces between the words reflects the switchover from "semi singing" reading to reading - to talk to oneself. Parchment or wove (bull calf leather) was used for pages in the first books. The covering pages were made from wood and were covered with leather. As dried parchment poorly formats, books were equipped with clamps or braces. In the late medieval times, when the first public libraries appeared, frequently books were fixed to the book shelves or tables for the prevention of theft. (Latin: libri catenati were used up to the 18th Century.) The first books were copied basically in monasteries one book at a time. With the development of Universities in the 18th century, the demand for books rose and a new method of copying came out. Books were divided into separate sheets (petsia), which were distributed among copyists. In this way, the books production rate was increased significantly. Guilds of traders liked this method, who started the production of religious and non-religious material. Xylography and incunabula In the beginning of the 14th century in Western Europe, xylography (it was developed long ago in the East) appeared. In xylography, a matrix with an image of a page was cut from a wooden piece. This wooden piece could be dipped in ink and used for making several pages. People started producing books as well as playing cards and religious works by xylography. But the creation of a book was a very laborious process, as for each page there was a requirement in the making of its own carving. Apart from this, the wood only lasted for a short duration it easily got erased and chapped. Chinese inventor Pi Sheng developed the ceramic composing matrix approximately in 1045, but examples of its printing are absent. He arranged the symbols in a small palate, coated with melted wax. Then he applied a board on it until all the symbols were aligned in one level. When the wax was cooled, he used this palate for printing. In the 15th century, Iogani Gutenberg designed the printing machine with metallic composing elements, which made books comparatively accessible (though for many people its was very costly). Printed books, individual sheets and illustrations, which were made in Europe before 1501, were known as incunabula (Latin incunabula "cradle"). Paper: Though the manufacturing of paper in Europe started approximately from the 11th century up to the 16th century, paper and wove were produced in similar volumes, but wove was costlier and stronger. Printers and publishers were frequently issued the same publication on both the materials so as to satisfy all the users. As many other medieval inventions, the first paper was made in China around 200 BC and reached Europe through the Muslim territories. Initially it was made from fabric, but the industrial revolution made it possible to make the paper from a cheaper material Cellulose.