Blooming Celebrities

Contest Info

  • Started: 3/1/2009 18:00
  • Ended: 3/5/2009 18:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 75
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Blooming Celebrities
Contest Directions: March 1 marks the beginning of spring - the time of the year to blossom, bloom, and fall in love.
Take any celebrity (or politician) and change any part(s) of their faces for elements of plants (leaves, flowers, fruits, vegetables, or trees) or butterflies. Here's a quick experiment with Angelina Jolie. Let's see if celebrities are still recognizable when they are blooming.
Please remember to include the names of celebrities in your entry titles.

Contest Info

    • Started: 3/1/2009 18:00
    • Ended: 3/5/2009 18:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 75
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
75 pictures
  • Will Smith Eggplant Head

    Will Smith Eggplant Head
  • Chris Rock Sunflower

    Chris Rock Sunflower
  • Morgan Freeman Ginger Chin

    Morgan Freeman Ginger Chin
  • Kristen Stewart Plant

    Kristen Stewart Plant
  • Rosie O'Donnell Cactus Flower

    Rosie O'Donnell Cactus Flower
  • Bruce Willis Walnut Head

    Bruce Willis Walnut Head
  • Mr Potato Head Bill O'Reilly

    Mr Potato Head  Bill O'Reilly
  • Obama Mushroom Head

    Obama Mushroom Head
  • Tony Blair Pumpkin Head

    Tony Blair Pumpkin Head
  • Mr. Bean Cabbage

    Mr. Bean Cabbage
75 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: The bloom (Latin: anthésis) is a set of physiological processes of sexual reproduction (generative development), occurring in flowering plants during the period from initiation of the flower up to fertilization. The flowering process is divided into two phases: 1) The initiation of the flowering primordiums; 2) the development of the primordiums till their fully opening-up. The development of flowers: The development of flowers in various plants begins during various periods of their life. Few plants, mainly annual, blossom very early: the sprout, which has barely come out of the seed, embeds into the soil and develops some leaves (for example, blind weeds (Capsella bursa-pastoris), types of watercress (Nasturtium), alyssum (Lepidium) etc). Other plants blossom much later, when young plants develop strong root systems and some leaves, in short, when it firms-up sufficiently, grows in strength and stores a reserve of nutrients necessary for development of flowers and seeds. This process of growing in strength can take a long time irrespective of growth conditions. In some plants (perennial and annual), the maturity period, that is blooming, happens after only two months of germination and after one year and in others (in many biennial plants), after several years (in perennial woody plants and shrubs). After growing-up, few plants bloom only once in their lives (such as, all annual as well as biennial plants and some from perennial plants, the so-called one-period, for example, aloes, some palm trees); such plants spend all their energy, all the reserve nutrients, accumulated sometimes for tens of years for the development of flowers and seeds and having exhausted the reserves, these plants perish. Other plants, after attaining maturity, bloom every year (perennial plants) till old age. The appearance of flowers and the presence of them in abundance depends, of course, to no small degree on growing conditions. Poor quality nourishment and sometimes excessive nutrition (rich with nitrogen) delays the blooming and considerably lowers the quantity of flowers. In addition, the degree of blooming depends on climatic conditions. For example, it is noticed, that polar and Alpine plants develop a huge quantity of flowers compared to plants in temperate latitudes. Some polar and Alpine plants are completely covered with bright flowers, which possibly is in connection with the short vegetation period. The humid climate also lowers blooming and has on effect on the brightness and colors of the flowers. Blooming starts, actually, from the moment when pollination (and fertilization) appears in the developed flowers, i.e., when parts of flower, which are taking part in pollination, become more or less free and accessible to the factors of pollination (wind, insects, water). This implies that blooming is obviously not observed in the plants with cleistogamous flowers, particularly with subsurface cleistogamous flowers. The blooming method, the actual blossoming of flowers, depends on the structure of flowers and on their location. In most simple flowers, consisting of only one stamen or pestle, blooming includes the breaking-up of the covering leaves, which cover the flowers (floral bracts) thus baring the flowers, i.e., freeing the anthers and pestles (in coniferous even ovules). In more complex flowers, having a perianth (floral envelope), this floral envelope one way or the other unfurls and more often promoting pollination factors. If the perianth (floral envelope) is simple and green, i.e., if its purpose is only to protect the young fertilization organs in the beginning and the young seeds later on, then it simply blossoms, whereas, parts of it partly or completely break up from one another, resulting in more or less easy access to the internal parts of the flower and sometimes such perianths (floral envelope) is even shed (in grapes, and in the flower-cup in the poppy). If the perianth (floral envelope) has an application as organ, attracting insects and in general, pollination mediators, i.e., when the perianth (floral envelope) is bright color (whether it is simple or not, for example, in the lily or corolla), then it more or less enlarges during blooming and its form is in connection with the form, size and other features of pollinators.