Animal Prototypes

Contest Info

  • Started: 2/16/2011 11:20
  • Ended: 2/19/2011 17:10
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 61
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Animal Prototypes
Contest Directions: February 12th is known as Darwin Day - it is the birthday of famous evolution scientist Charles Darwin, who laid the foundations for the evolution theory - mutation & natural selection. As per Darwin, mutation provides new traits for species, and then the nature "selects" those species with advantageous heritable traits - the process Darwin called "natural selection". The path of evolution goes from simpler to more complex forms of life.
So, as per Darwin, the species we see today had simpler prototypes that gradually evolved. How could the dog prototype look like (Dog v0.1)? What about the cow prototype? Or even the human prototype? To celebrate Darwin Day at Freaking News, let's show how the prototypes of different animal species could look like. Some examples - showing any species (human or animal) with some body parts removed, or simplified body shapes. (You can not merge body parts of animals of different species, but you can merge/alter body parts of animals of the same species.)

Contest Info

    • Started: 2/16/2011 11:20
    • Ended: 2/19/2011 17:10
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 61
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
61 pictures
  • Mutant Man with Beard

    Mutant Man with Beard
  • Snail with no Shell

    Snail with no Shell
  • Horse Kangaroos

    Horse Kangaroos
  • Tyrannosaurus Horse vs Early Man

    Tyrannosaurus Horse vs Early Man
  • Rhinoceros Dinosaur

    Rhinoceros Dinosaur
  • Dinosaur Rooster

    Dinosaur Rooster
  • Super Multi Udder Car

    Super Multi Udder Car
  • Bird Dinosaur

    Bird Dinosaur
  • Multi Colored Zebra

    Multi Colored Zebra
  • Big Frog

    Big Frog
61 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: We will talk about how to catch some wild animals. And about those who catch these animals. As it is known, the ostrich, though it weighs 150 kgs is a top class runner and it would be difficult sometimes to even catch up with it in a vehicle. But, here lies its first weakness: an ostrich is not afraid of humans and therefore, allows the vehicle to approach up to 80m and the second weakness - its starting speed is rather insignificant. The chase begins. The hunter, having chosen a good ostrich from the herd, drives it away from its companions. As soon as the ostrich starts to exhaust, the hunter throws a lasso on it (it is necessary to take the utmost care with the ostrich as its neck is fragile) and gradually slows down its run. The vehicle catches up with the bird, "tripping" on savanna, the hunter jumps on its back and brings it down onto the ground. Then the hunter takes out a scarf from a pocket and ties the eyes of the captured bird tightly with the scarf. Here is the classic example of using "ostrich's policy" for purely practical purposes! Blindfolded, the captured ostrich feels calm and comfortable as when it buries its head in the sand. The ostrich now sees nothing and thinks all the dangers are behind; this relieves it of the inevitable shock, which can stop its heart beating. From there it is simple: the tied ostrich is loaded into the vehicle and taken to a new home. Does a wild animal need more? Such questions arises each time, when followers of the up-to-date chemical hunting method go on hunting. This way is sufficiently simple and superficially resembles regular hunting. Only a capsule with a drug is fired into the animal from a barrel of a special gun instead of a lead bullet. This way is a good way of catching any animal, which allows the human being to be a short distance away. However, it is simply necessary in those cases, when it is not possible to track the animal - try to track an animal, for instance, a bird or hippopotamus, which at the first hint of danger, dives into water for safety. The most important and most difficult thing in this hunting is to calculate the dosage of the drug, based on the physiological characteristics of an animal. An excessive dose can kill an animal and an insufficient dosage, in certain cases, can be fatal too. Imagine what will occur if a soporific drug starts acting on a hippopotamus after it plunges into water! So, in brief, wild animals are also caught in this same manner. As you can see, there are many methods and only one thing that unites the hunters undoubtedly, is the mandatory and extensive preparation of the hunters.